Value Chain Analysis


The term value chain describes a way of looking at a business as a chain of activities that transform inputs into outputs that customers value. Customer value derives from three basic sources: activities that differentiate the product, activities that lower its cost, and activities that meet the customer’s need quickly. Value chain analysis (VAC) attempts to understand how a business creates customer value by examining the contributions of different activities within the business to that value.

VCA takes a process point of view: it divides (sometimes called disaggregates) the business into sets of activities that occur within the business, starting with the inputs a firm receives and finishing with the firm’s products (or services) and after-sales service to customers. VCA attempts to look at its costs across the series of activities the business performs to determine where low-cost advantages or cost disadvantages exist. It looks at the attributes of each of these different activities to determine in what ways each activity that occurs between purchasing inputs and after-sales service helps differentiate the company’s products and services. Proponents of VCA believe it allows managers to better identify their firm’s strengths and weaknesses by looking at the business as a process—a chain of activities—of what actually happens in the business rather than simply looking at it based on arbitrary organizational dividing lines or historical accounting protocol.

Judgment is required across individual firms and different industries because what may be seen as a support activity in one firm or industry may be a primary activity in another. Computer operations might typically be seen as infrastructure support, for example, but may be seen as a primary activity in airlines, newspapers, or banks.

My Consultancy–Asif J. Mir – Management Consultant–transforms organizations where people have the freedom to be creative, a place that brings out the best in everybody–an open, fair place where people have a sense that what they do matters. For details please visit www.asifjmir.com, and my Lectures.

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Functional Sources of Innovation


There are five major sources of innovation for a firm: 1) its own internal value chain functions, 2) its external value-added chain of suppliers, customers, and complementary innovators, 3) university, government, and private laboratories, 4) competitors and related industries, and 5) other nations or regions.

My Consultancy–Asif J. Mir – Management Consultant–transforms organizations where people have the freedom to be creative, a place that brings out the best in everybody–an open, fair place where people have a sense that what they do matters. For details please visit www.asifjmir.com, and my Lectures.

Sensible Approach to Strategic Planning


You can design strategies in many ways—usually involving a mixture of analysis, reasoning, experience and intuition. One approach looks at the organization’s strengths and weaknesses in relation to its competitors. If most of your competitors are making low quality products, a good strategy is to make the best products available. Supermarket chains are building very large, out of town stores—so small, convenient, local stores; many airlines compete with cheap, no-frills services.

There are many ways to approach strategic planning. The key to successful planning is to get the best fit between the chosen tools and techniques, the organization’s current culture, capabilities and business environment and the desired outcome. One useful approach has the following steps:

  1. Analyze your organization’s mission and other strategic plans, to find the context and overall aims of this strategy.
  2. Set goals to show the results that this strategy must achieve.
  3. Analyze your existing strategies, finding their aims, seeing how well these are being achieved and looking for improvements.
  4. Analyze the environment in which your organization works, giving the competitors, their performance, customers, products and etc.
  5. Find the factors that will lead to success in this environment, and the importance of each; emphasize the products needed to compete effectively.
  6. Describe the approach that will best achieve success; emphasize the process that can best deliver your products.
  7. Design the best organizational support, including structure, controls and related functions.
  8. Define measures to compare actual performance with planned, optimal and competitors’ performances.
  9. Implement the plans, setting the aims and conditions for other levels of decisions.
  10. Monitor actual performance and continuously look for improvements.

My Consultancy–Asif J. Mir – Management Consultant–transforms organizations where people have the freedom to be creative, a place that brings out the best in everybody–an open, fair place where people have a sense that what they do matters. For details please visit www.asifjmir.com, and my Lectures.

Involving Employees


To be successful when facing multiple tasks, often on multiple projects, more employees at all levels will need to delegate some of their activities and responsibilities to other organizational members. This means that employees are going to have to be give certain amounts of authority to make decisions that directly effect their work. Even though delegation was once perceived as something that managers did with lower levels of management, delegation will be required at all levels of the organization—in essence, peer delegation, or using influence without authority.

In addition to being required to take on more responsibilities, employees will be expected to make decisions without the benefit of the tried-and-true decisions of the past. And because all these employees are part of the process today, there is more of a need for them to contribute to the decision-making process. In most organizations, the days of autocratic management are over. To facilitate customer demands and fulfill corporate expectations, today’s employees need to be more involved. Group decision-making enables these employees to have more input into the processes, and greater access to needed information. Such actions are also consistent with work environments that require increased creativity and innovation.

Another phenomenon of involving employees will be an emphasis on work teams. The bureaucratic structure of yesterday—where clear lines of authority existed and the chain of command was paramount—is not appropriate for many of today’s companies. Workers from different specializations in an organization are increasingly required to work together to successfully complete complex projects. As such traditional work areas have given way to more of a team effort, building and capitalizing on the various skills and backgrounds that each member brings to the team.

Involving employees allows them an opportunity to focus on the job goals. By giving them more freedom, employees are in a better position to develop the means to achieve the desired results.

My Consultancy–Asif J. Mir – Management Consultant–transforms organizations where people have the freedom to be creative, a place that brings out the best in everybody–an open, fair place where people have a sense that what they do matters. For details please visit www.asifjmir.com, Lectures, Line of Sight

Management Process


Management writers traditionally refer to the manager’s four basic functions:

a)        Planning: Planning is setting goals and deciding on courses of action, developing rules and procedures, developing plans (both the organization and for those who work in it), and forecasting (predicting or projecting what the future holds for the firm).

b)        Organizing: Organizing is identifying jobs to be done, hiring people to do them, establishing departments, delegating or pushing authority down to subordinates, establishing a chain of command (in other words, channels of authority and communication), and coordinating the  work of subordinates.

c)        Leading: Leading means influencing other people to get the job done, maintaining morale, molding company culture, and managing conflicts and communication.

d)        Controlling: Controlling is setting standards (such as sales quotas or quality standards), comparing actual performance with these standards, and then taking corrective action as required.

My Consultancy–Asif J. Mir – Management Consultant–transforms organizations where people have the freedom to be creative, a place that brings out the best in everybody–an open, fair place where people have a sense that what they do matters. For details please visit www.asifjmir.com, Lectures, Line of Sight

Flatten your Organization


Flattening the organization means that each manager becomes responsible for more people. There is a limit to the number of people that one person can supervise, but this span of authority varies widely between jobs. Most people imagine that a manager can only handle a few subordinates. In reality, proper delegation allows you a surprisingly wide span, allowing a much flatter and leaner organization.

Your organization should have the best structure for achieving its goals. This structure shows the internal divisions of the organization; and the relationships between them. The structure is not fixed, but evolves to meet changing conditions. Unfortunately, this generally means a drift towards more complex structures, with more divisions, extra layers of management, longer chains of command, less delegation and more centralization. Endless levels of management can be used for minor rewards and recognition.

The proliferation of management layers is hopelessly inefficient. It forms an army of people whose only job is to force information to travel through a long and convoluted route before it is used, and makes sure that decision makers become hopelessly remote from the operations.

Delegation has clear advantages and empowerment allows you to reduce the layers of management. So the best type of organization is as flat as possible, with only a few layers of management. The organization must be flat, so that the top is connected to the people who actually make the money.

My Consultancy–Asif J. Mir – Management Consultant–transforms organizations where people have the freedom to be creative, a place that brings out the best in everybody–an open, fair place where people have a sense that what they do matters. For details please visit www.asifjmir.com, Line of Sight

Key Objectives of Logestics Strategy


  1. To optimize customer Service

The logistics system will provide products and information to customers in a way that equals or exceeds the stated requirements of each individual customer.

  1. To minimize the cost of supply chain operations

The logistics system will be structured and operated with a view to minimizing:

  • The fixed assets employed in supply chain activities;
  • The operating costs of the chain;
  • The inventory held within the chain.

Cost minimization will, however, be set within the context of achieving specified customer service targets.

  1. To maximize the flexibility of supply chain

The logistics system will be designed to permit Tallent Engineering to respond with maximum flexibility to:

  • Customers’ short-term operational fluctuations in demand;
  • Longer-term strategic changes in demand either from existing customers (e.g. new models) or the wider market place (e.g., new customers/new product groups).

My Consultancy–Asif J. Mir – Management Consultant–transforms organizations where people have the freedom to be creative, a place that brings out the best in everybody–an open, fair place where people have a sense that what they do matters. For details please visit www.asifjmir.com, Line of Sight

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