Sensible Approach to Strategic Planning


You can design strategies in many ways—usually involving a mixture of analysis, reasoning, experience and intuition. One approach looks at the organization’s strengths and weaknesses in relation to its competitors. If most of your competitors are making low quality products, a good strategy is to make the best products available. Supermarket chains are building very large, out of town stores—so small, convenient, local stores; many airlines compete with cheap, no-frills services.

There are many ways to approach strategic planning. The key to successful planning is to get the best fit between the chosen tools and techniques, the organization’s current culture, capabilities and business environment and the desired outcome. One useful approach has the following steps:

  1. Analyze your organization’s mission and other strategic plans, to find the context and overall aims of this strategy.
  2. Set goals to show the results that this strategy must achieve.
  3. Analyze your existing strategies, finding their aims, seeing how well these are being achieved and looking for improvements.
  4. Analyze the environment in which your organization works, giving the competitors, their performance, customers, products and etc.
  5. Find the factors that will lead to success in this environment, and the importance of each; emphasize the products needed to compete effectively.
  6. Describe the approach that will best achieve success; emphasize the process that can best deliver your products.
  7. Design the best organizational support, including structure, controls and related functions.
  8. Define measures to compare actual performance with planned, optimal and competitors’ performances.
  9. Implement the plans, setting the aims and conditions for other levels of decisions.
  10. Monitor actual performance and continuously look for improvements.

My Consultancy–Asif J. Mir – Management Consultant–transforms organizations where people have the freedom to be creative, a place that brings out the best in everybody–an open, fair place where people have a sense that what they do matters. For details please visit www.asifjmir.com, and my Lectures.

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Doing Foreign Business for Wrong Reasons


The wrong reasons for entering a market include; large population, cheap labor, and “Everyone else is going there.” Population does not necessarily mean consumers or a skilled work force, and even a large consumer base does not mean there is an established market. A terrific investment in education and the establishment of an infrastructure for the conduct of business, whether manufacturing or marketing, may be necessary.

Some markets may be too small to support the cost of doing business. It is critical to enter only these markets where you can serve customers to their satisfaction. An inadequate understanding of products due to degree of technical sophistication and language barriers may require special attention to adapt documentation, training and support to the market and customer. Many apparently small markets can be surprisingly active.

My Consultancy–Asif J. Mir – Management Consultant–transforms organizations where people have the freedom to be creative, a place that brings out the best in everybody–an open, fair place where people have a sense that what they do matters. For details please visit www.asifjmir.com, Lectures, Line of Sight

Play your Cards Right


Business cards may be commonplace, but they are vital too. Wherever you are, you will do better with a formal style of card, without advertising, and with clear information in English on one side and the local language on the other.

Business card etiquette is no mere ritual. In places such as Japan a business card is both mini-resume and a ticket to the game of business; a certain amount of gamesmanship is necessary to make the best use of the ticket. The first rule is never to be without cards, any more than a samurai would be without his sword. Never being without cards in Japan means taking fifty or more cards to every meeting. The second rule is to respect the cards, keeping them in a distinctive holder. Keeping your cards in your pocket or in a cheap plastic envelop is like making a business call with a shopping bag instead of a briefcase.

The third rule is to handle the card with formality. The card is presented, not merely handed. Japanese books of etiquette even point out a variety of ways to hold the card. Fourth, try to hand cards out in descending order of rank. The fifth rule is to receive another’s card gracefully, using both hands and never stuffing the card recklessly into your pocket.

My Consultancy–Asif J. Mir – Management Consultant–transforms organizations where people have the freedom to be creative, a place that brings out the best in everybody–an open, fair place where people have a sense that what they do matters. For details please visit www.asifjmir.com, Line of Sight