Public Management


There will be absolutely changed conditions under which public managers will operate in the future, some of the areas of knowledge, skills, and attitudes that they will be required to possess, and some of the pathways public managers might explore in order to move toward the future.

There will be an extraordinary explosion of new knowledge and technological innovations, especially in the areas of information sciences, genetics, materials, instrumentation, automation, and space. Our public managers will wade into an age of extraordinary technological change and have to accommodate themselves and the institutions to dramatically different bodies of knowledge and technological innovations.

They will not only have to cope with and employ their expanded knowledge and technological capacity, they will have to learn to use this knowledge and technological capacity for the benefit of society. In the technological world of the future, there will be even greater temptations for them to be captured by technology, to fall prey to “technological imperative,” and to allow rational technical interests to supercede human concerns and those of values. Finding ways of employing advanced technologies so as to enhance rather than restrict their capacity for leadership, creativity, and personal responsibility will be a serious challenge.

In the future, knowledge and information will prevail. And if information is power, then those who have information will indeed have power. But who will have information? Information will be increasingly centralized, controlled and marketed through traditional economic and political processes. It will be widely distributed throughout society, so that increasing rather than decreasing numbers of people will have information and in turn have power. Such a possibility will lead to “the twilight of hierarchy,” to be inevitable.

Combining these issues, we can safely predict that the knowledge or information that our public managers will be able to access will be tremendous, to the point that the quantity of information will no longer be the most important issue. Rather the key question will be how to organize this information for human purposes. This means that public administration will have to learn to organize information in a fashion that will facilitate the pursuit of important public purposes. The great challenge will be to organize information so that we can enhance the process of democratic decision-making, of consensus building, and of dialogue and deliberation.

There’s no question that we will have the capacity to organize information for dramatic new public purposes, to restructure our structures of governance in dramatic ways. But what will our choices be? Imagine a computer in Islamabad that could reach out into every home, so that on any occasion that a major policy decision was required, an appropriate message could go out to all the citizens and their answers could guide public policy – a process that would approximate pure democracy.

The globalization of society is obvious today, though in twenty-five years or so, we may experience trans-globalization or beyond, as the frontiers of the oceans and space are extended even further. Already we are thinking more in global terms. However, our managers are still thinking in terms of traditional institutions operating in a new global context. They are not yet asking how they reconfigure businesses and governments so as to carry out a global vision. How do they encourage businesses and governments to assume global responsibilities rather than those defined in terms of one’s own self interest? For example, how can developing countries move toward sustainable development and environmental justice on a global basis?

One obvious casualty of the global age may be the nation-state, replaced not necessarily by a new global or interplanetary federation but possibly by new forms of governance far beyond those we can imagine today.

In future our public administration should know the importance of “responsibilities” rather than “functions” of government. While a large part of the current worldwide debate over privatization or outsourcing speaks to the question of which “functions” belong where, the new debate will necessarily focus on public responsibilities and speak in a language of ethics, citizenship and the public interest.

In reinvented government or the new public management, customers shall replace citizens – or, to put it differently, the integrative role of citizenship has been reduced to the narrow self-interest of customership – in government as in business.

Indeed, we think the job of all public managers will increasingly be more than directing or managing our public organizations. It will be not merely “steering” or “rowing” but “building the boat.” The new public manager will construct networks of varied interests that can work effectively to solve public problems. In doing so, it will be the job of the public administrator to promote pluralism, to create opportunities for constructive dissent, to preserve that which is distinctive about individuals and groups, and to provide an opportunity for diverse groups to share in establishing future directions for the community. The administrator will play a substantial role in diminishing polarization, teaching diversity and respect, building coalitions, resolving disputes, negotiating and mediating. The work of the top public managers will thus be – to build community.

There are two broad areas that public managers will need to explore in order to fashion a response to the trends. These emerging trends will turn public management both “inside-out” and “upside-down.” Public management will be turned “inside-out” as the largely internal focus of management in the past is replaced by an external focus, specifically a focus on citizens and citizenship. Public management will be turned “upside-down” as the traditional top-down orientation of the field is replaced – not necessarily by a bottom-up approach, but by a system of shared leadership.

In the past public administration has been largely focused on what happens within the public bureaucracy. The future will require that it dramatically refocus its attention on the world outside, particularly the world of citizens and citizenship.

My Consultancy–Asif J. Mir Management Consultant–transforms organizations where people have the freedom to be creative, a place that brings out the best in everybody–an open, fair place where people have a sense that what they do matters. For details please contact www.asifjmir.com, Line of Sight

Human Resource Management


Human resource management is the process of acquiring, training, appraising, and compensating employees, and attending to their labor relations, health and safety, and fairness concerns. The topics provide you with the concepts and techniques you need to carry out the people or personnel aspects of your management job. They include:

  • Conducting job analysis (determining the nature of each employee’s job):
  • Planning labor needs and recruiting job candidates;
  • Selecting job candidates;
  • Orienting and training new employees;
  • Managing wages and salaries (compensating employees);
  • Providing incentives and benefits;
  • Appraising performance;
  • Communicating (interviewing, counseling, disciplining);
  • Training and developing managers;
  • Building employee commitment.

A manager should know about:

  • Equal opportunity and affirmative action;
  • Employee health and safety;
  • Handling grievances and labor relations.

My Consultancy–Asif J. Mir – Management Consultant–transforms organizations where people have the freedom to be creative, a place that brings out the best in everybody–an open, fair place where people have a sense that what they do matters. For details please contact www.asifjmir.com, Line of Sight

Warping Higher Customer Satisfaction


You can improve your management of others to enable you to deliver higher customer satisfaction:

  1. Listen to other people around you,  no matter what their experience or lack of it and listen without judgment–every opinion is a valid one. If you hear two or three ideas together they can often spark a fourth, which you wouldn’t have arrived at if you’d heard them with a judgment.
  2. Use praise. Use praise more frequently and more sincerely than you’ve ever done in the past. Every night when you go home, if you’re a manager or even if you are not, ask yourself have I said thank you? to three people for three different things today? If you haven’t, it either means one of two things: that no body that you work with, or for, has actually done anything which is worth saying thank you for , or that they have done things of note but you haven’t noticed.
  3. If you can’t say something positive, don’t say anything. If you went into a meeting with your manager and they ran through a list of 20 things that they were pleased with and just as you were leaving they delivered one negative criticism, the chances are that this is the one thought that would stay with you, the other 20 would disappear in the length and shadow of the negative criticism. Negative criticism has virtually no practical application. If you have to say something then think it through and put it into a positive context. Remember that people will normally do the best they can with what they have. If they are not doing the best that they can, then you need to help them to see what can be done and what talents, resources, or alternatives exist for the.
  4. Always be seen to be fair and honest. If there’s one thing that can demotivate staff and people around you quicker than almost anything, it is people having favorites.
  5. Share your concerns. Managing a customer service team, an organization, or being an entrepreneur is not an easy job. Whilst you need to be decisive and have confidence and courage that inspires people, there is much to be gained from being open and sharing your own hopes, dreams and concerns.  One of the things that people often like in working in a small business, perhaps one which has an entrepreneurial flair to it, is the enthusiaism and the sheer energy that those people can put into theirday and they do, every signle day. Remind people what you’re doing, where you’re going and why you do what you do.
  6. Become a teacher. Instead of finding fault, managing by exception, and pointing out where people are going wrong, become obsessed with helping people become twice as good as they are now. If you manage people, or you aspire to manage or lead people, then your goal should be to make sure thatas quickly as possible they can do their job twice as well as they’re doing it now, even if it means them being promoting or leaving. There is nothing more satisfying than seeing other people around you do well, especially if you know you’ve contributed to that. Don’t ask yourself what can I do for myself?  Instead, ask yourself, how can I help my team become a better team?  Take a few minutes at regular intervals, at random times during the day if necessary, and teach people different ways of doing things–upgrade their skills, explain different aspects of the business, formalize it–put together different training programs so that people, over a period of time, will really move forward in both their skills, their knowledge and their habits.
  7. Kiesin is a Japanese word that has no equivalent in the English language. It roughly translates as constant and never ending improvement.  The Japanese philosophy is to do a thousand things one percent better not one thing a thousand percent better. This means that everybody that you work with–every supplier, every employee, and every manager, everybody in the customer satisfaction value chain–should be constantly required to innovate, to improve and suggest ideas. Coming up with ways to improve how things are done, should  almost become a mandatory part of any job.
  8. Develop yourself. If there’s one way that you can get other people to become more interested and more focused on improving themselves, it is to lead by example. Take time out to go on training courses, even though you masy be too busy. Take time to read useful information, not just novels, books or newspapers but actual up-to-date books and tesxts from the experts within your industry. Practise your skills, use them and make sure that they’re developed as far as they possibly can be. If it means learning a new language or learning a skill that you don’t have then take on the challenge. It is very difficult to manage people well if you have low self esteem but if you feel good about yourself and you have that feeling of progress and achievement, then it is very hard for this not to rub off on other people.
  9. Only do the most important things. Ask yourself that question or a version of it every single minute of the day:Is what I’m doing now helping directly or indirectly to increase the number and quality of the customers our organization has? Because if it doesn’t affect the customer, it shouldn’t be done.

My Consultancy–Asif J. Mir – Management Consultant–transformserorganizations where people have the freedom to be creative, a place that brings out the best in everybody–an open, fair place where people have a sense that what they do matters. For details please contact Asif J. Mir

Group Mapping


Group mapping can be seen as similar to brainstorming and seeks to surface contributions from all those attending. However, group mapping used for strategy making has a number of important differences from brainstorming.

Group mapping encompasses the surfacing of assumptions, concerns, facts, assertions and constraints along with their relationships. The process of detecting how issues impact upon one another is found by most managers to be an activity that they can relate. Group mapping thus aims to release deep knowledge and wisdom to get beyond the apparently similar descriptions of situations and into the subtle, but important, differences of what has to be done and why.

My Consultancy–Asif J. Mir – Management Consultant–transforms organizations where people have the freedom to be creative, a place that brings out the best in everybody–an open, fair place where people have a sense that what they do matters. For details please contact Asif J. Mir.

Public Servant – Types of Misconduct


A public servant will be guilty of misconduct if he:

  1. Is rude or offensive, or assaults or even threatens to assault or attempts to assault.
  2. Has disregard for the circumstances and concerns of the public in performing his official duties and in the making of decisions affecting them.
  3. Discriminates on account of race, gender, ethnic or social, religion, color, sex, age, disability, political persuasion, conscience, belief, culture or language.
  4. Uses his position in the public service to promote or to prejudice the interest of any political party.
  5. Conducts himself in a disgraceful, improper or unbecoming manner.
  6. Refuses to give basic information that is required by any citizen.
  7. Favors relatives and friends in work-related activities and abuses his authority or influences another employee, or is influenced to abuse his authority.
  8. Does not strive to achieve the objectives of his institution cost-effectively and in the public’s interest.
  9. Is not punctual in the execution of his duties and does not provide timely service.
  10. Does not execute his duties in a professional and competent manner.
  11. Is dishonest and not accountable in dealing with public funds and uses the public service’s property and other resources ineffectively, inefficiently, and for unauthorized official purposes.
  12. Does not promote sound, efficient, effective, transparent and accountable administration.
  13. In the course of his official duties, fails to report to the appropriate authorities, fraud, corruption, nepotism, misadministration and any other act which constitutes an offence, or which is prejudicial to the public interest.
  14. Does not give honest and impartial advice, based on all available relevant information.
  15. Does not honor the confidentiality of matters, documents and discussions, classified or implied as being confidential or secret.
  16. Does not dress and behave in a manner that enhances the reputation of the public service during official duties.
  17. Is negligent or indolent in the carrying out of his duties.
  18. Falsifies records or any other documentation.
  19. Is under the influence of an intoxication, illegal or habit forming drug including smoking whilst at work.
  20. Asks the citizens for a favor in return for some service or refuses to provide with a service unless he is paid a bribe.
  21. Uses or discloses any official information for personal gain or the gain of others.
  22. Undertakes paid work outside his official duties or uses office equipment for such work.

My Consultancy–Asif J. Mir – Management Consultant–transforms organizations where people have the freedom to be creative, a place that brings out the best in everybody–an open, fair place where people have a sense that what they do matters. For details please contact Asif J. Mir.