Boss-centered Leadership


For some leaders, anything goes. The end justifies the means—deceit and manipulation included. This leadership style is known as Machiavellanism, after Niccolo Machiavelli, who set it out in 1532 in his book The Prince. He argued that a leader is justified in using any technique, no matter how deceitful, to manipulate and to control people and to strike down enemies. Researchers have devised various tests to determine the degree to which individuals are “High Machs” (manipulators of other people) or “Low Machs” (not manipulators of other people).

High Machs are coolly aloof. They appraise a situation and other people in a logical and detached fashion rather than emotionally. Apparently this insensitivity permits them to manipulate others while pursuing their own goals.

The Low Mach, the typical “nice guy” who likes and trusts people, is not detached enough to exploit others.

My Consultancy–Asif J. Mir – Management Consultant–transforms organizations where people have the freedom to be creative, a place that brings out the best in everybody–an open, fair place where people have a sense that what they do matters. For details please visit www.asifjmir.com, and my Lectures.

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People as Numbers


Generally, it is accepted that modern human resource planning should have a wider perspective, in tune with the philosophy of HRM, including ‘softer’ issues such as competence, commitment and career development. Modern human resource planning continues to use the ‘hard’ techniques of manpower planning but also includes a new focus on shaping values, beliefs and culture. Anticipating strategy, market conditions and demographic change.

Nevertheless, in line with the tradition of formal, observable and ‘objective’ planning, numerical measurement and forecasting having been favored over quantitative studies on opinion, attitude and motivation. ‘Hard’ data allows managers and planners to sit in their offices and wait for information. ‘No need to to go out and meet the troops, or the customers, to find out how the products get bought … all that just wastes valuable time.’ The growth of information technology and management information systems has made numerical data readily available and possibly further discouraged collection of qualitative information. Numbers give a comforting feeling of unarguable objectivity and allow managers to detach themselves from shop-floor emotions. It is much easier to sack a number than a real human being.

My Consultancy–Asif J. Mir – Management Consultant–transforms organizations where people have the freedom to be creative, a place that brings out the best in everybody–an open, fair place where people have a sense that what they do matters. For details please visit www.asifjmir.com, Line of Sight

Cost Productivity Allocation


Most organizations pay close attention only to costs. They track them, control them, and keep them at rock-bottom levels. This could be a mistake for two reasons: First, cost should not be detached from performance. Driving costs down for its own sake inevitably drives performance down. This causes productivity to drop in the long run. Second, there are many times when costs must be allowed to go up in order to achieve an important performance target.

 

The key question is where the money will come from if budgets are tight. Cost-productivity allocation is a technique for the reallocation of money to improve productivity. It works against the traditional, across-the-board percentage cuts, which remove the good with the bad. The proposed technique permits the identification of cost items that are critical and finds the small outlay of money needed to improve productivity.

 

The theoretical background of this technique is the analysis and reallocation of the following four cost categories:

1)      Cost avoidance – removing or eliminating a cost item that is anticipated and budgeted for but not expended.

2)      Cost reduction – reducing or decreasing the amount of a cost item that has been budgeted for and is a process of expenditure.

3)      Cost control – spending, but keeping the amount of a cost item within the budget standard.

4)      Cost effectiveness – increasing the spending allocated in a budget because it will improve performance or reduce costs in the long run.

 

My Consultancy–Asif J. Mir – Management Consultant–transforms organizations where people have the freedom to be creative, a place that brings out the best in everybody–an open, fair place where people have a sense that what they do matters. For details please contact www.asifjmir.com, Line of Sight