Competitive Marketing Theories


Competitive market theories are derived from the neo-classical economic concepts of rational choice and maximization of utility. The assumption is that individuals choose jobs which offer them maximum benefits. The utility or value of these benefits – money, vacation time, pension entitlement and so on – vary for different individuals according to their personal preferences. People move from one organization to another if improved benefits are available. At the same time, employer organizations attempt to get the most from their employees for the lowest possible cost.

The outcome of this process is a dynamic and shifting equilibrium in which both employees and organizations compete to maximize benefits for themselves. Within a specific region or industry there is a balance between supply and demand for human resources. Pay and conditions for employees are determined by the relative scarcity or abundance of skills and abilities in the employment market. Competitive forces push wages up when demand for products – and hence employees – increases, and downwards when the economy is in recession. In the latter case a market clearing wage is eventually arrived at which is sufficiently low to encourage employers to increase recruitment and eliminate unemployment. This discourse reinforces the view that employees are objects to be traded like any other commodities in the market – human resources in the hardest possible sense. Supposedly, they offer themselves – their skills and human qualities – for sale to the highest bidders. Within this mindset they could just as well be vegetables on a market stall.

Competition theories assume that job-seekers have perfect knowledge of available jobs and benefits. Job-searching is an expensive and time consuming business. The unemployed do not have money and those in work do not have time. The result is that few people conduct the extensive searches required to find jobs which meet their preferences perfectly. In practice, most individuals settle for employment which is quickly obtained and which exceeds the reserve minimum wage they have in mind. There is a considerable element of luck involved. Moreover, the job-seeker does not make the choice: in most cases the decision is in the hands of employer.

My Consultancy–Asif J. Mir – Management Consultant–transforms organizations where people have the freedom to be creative, a place that brings out the best in everybody–an open, fair place where people have a sense that what they do matters. For details please visit www.asifjmir.com, and my Lectures.

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Market Survey


Stated most simply, the objective of a market survey is to determine a reasonably attainable sales volume in a specific market area for a specific type of business. This means finding out how many potential consumers of the planned merchandise or service there are in this market and how many of them can reasonably be expected to become customers of the firm under consideration.

The thoroughness of a market survey will vary under different conditions. The survey is essential for stores that plan to develop much of their own customer traffic. If sales are to depend on the firm’s merchandising policies, sales promotion efforts, special services, or uniqueness, a particularly thorough market survey should be made in advance. Firms that plan to rely on the established customer flow already generated by other businesses in the area may follow less thorough procedures. The latter types of firms have often been described as “parasite stores,” meaning that their location has been dictated by the existing firms in the area that have attracted a substantial traffic flow and which the new firm will tap for its own sales. Examples of small firms in this category are a restaurant in a skyscraper lobby, a medium-priced dress shop next to a large department store, an office-building tobacco shop, or a drugstore in an airline terminal. In these cases, the amount and nature of the traffic and its sales potential are pretty well established. Such firms may still, however, exert various types of sales promotion activities to increase total income within the traffic.

The chief concern here is with the types of firms that may rely heavily on a market survey to help them build much of their customer traffic.

My Consultancy–Asif J. Mir – Management Consultant–transforms organizations where people have the freedom to be creative, a place that brings out the best in everybody–an open, fair place where people have a sense that what they do matters. For details please visit www.asifjmir.com, and my Lectures.

Company Performance Appraisal


Company performance appraisal studies the trends of specific profitability and productivity ratios derived from financial statements for at least past three  periods (year, quarter, month). Its main purpose is to diagnose problem areas through establishing productivity indicators for continuous monitoring and control of the whole enterprise, in order to set up an appropriate productivity improvement programs.

 

In conducting company performance appraisal, two basic comparisons have to be made:

a.       Between current performance and a historical base performance;

b.       Between actual performance and the target.

 

The former indicates whether performance is improving or declining and at what rate. The latter requires that performance or productivity targets be set and matched against actual performance.

 

Using profitability along as the basis for evaluating the overall performance of an organization makes it difficult to identify the cause of profitability changes. Are they due to productivity or price-cost movement? The following demonstrates this relationship:

 

            Output value     =          Quantity sold     X          Unit price

 

 

             Profitability       =          Productivity       X          Price recovery

 

 

             Input value        =          Quantity used    X          Unit cost

 

Considering the relationships over time, profitability is defined as charge in output value compared with change in input value; productivity as the change between quantity of output and/or quantity in unit price, and change in unit cost.

 

In effect, what is computed are performance ratios classified into:

  • Change in profitability;
  • Change in productivity;
  • Change in price recovery.

 These performance ratios are then evaluated in relation to their effect on profits. In general, a drop in profitability, in productivity or in price recovery reduces profits. Lower productivity signals a need for further analysis and for correction action. However, increased productivity does not necessarily lead to profitability on a short-term basis. The effect of increased productivity will be realized only in terms of long-term profitability.

 My Consultancy–Asif J. Mir – Management Consultant–transforms organizations where people have the freedom to be creative, a place that brings out the best in everybody–an open, fair place where people have a sense that what they do matters. For details please contact www.asifjmir.com, Line of Sight