Managing Cultural Change


When management acts to focus explicit structures, work design, staffing and development, and performance system/rewards on desired changes, the combined impact can be tremendous. Through management action, the culture can be changed to support the business strategy. Management communication of the company mission, vision, values, and strategic objectives is only the first step in the process.

Top executives must promulgate a vision; however, a brilliant vision statement won’t budge a culture unless it is backed up by action. The management system has to be put in place, and then management has to live by it. Culture is not something managers set out to change directly; rather, it is an outcome of consistent, positive management action, every day and in every way. Too often good strategic ideas and directions are translated too narrowly into plans. There are many examples, including quality of work life, participative management, quality circles, and service excellence. Even broadly conceived total quality management efforts risk faltering because they are being implemented as programs, rather than as broad, deep, multi-faceted activities.

The problem is not the association of an idea, with a program, but rather the existence of too few programs expressing the idea. Changes take hold when they are reflected in multiple concrete manifestations throughout the organization. It is when the structures surrounding a change also change to support it that we say a change is institutionalized—that it is now part of legitimate and ongoing practice, infused with value and supported by other aspects of the system.

My Consultancy–Asif J. Mir – Management Consultant–transforms organizations where people have the freedom to be creative, a place that brings out the best in everybody–an open, fair place where people have a sense that what they do matters. For details please visit www.asifjmir.com, and my Lectures.

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Downsizing, Rightsizing


Indeed, organizations have been rapidly reducing the number of employees needed to operate effectively—a process known as downsizing. Typically this involves more than just laying off people in a move to save money. It is directed at adjusting the number of employees needed to work in newly designed organizations and is, therefore, also known as rightsizing. Whatever you call it, the bottom line is clear. Many organizations need fewer people to operate today than in the past—sometimes far fewer. The statistics tell a sobering tale. Downsizings are not a unique manifestation of current economic trends. In the recent past, some degree of downsizing has occurred in about half of all companies—especially in the middle management and supervisory ranks. Experts agree that rapid changes in technology have been largely responsible for much of this.

My Consultancy–Asif J. Mir – Management Consultant–transforms organizations where people have the freedom to be creative, a place that brings out the best in everybody–an open, fair place where people have a sense that what they do matters. For details please visit www.asifjmir.com, and my Lectures.

Treating Employees as Customers


If employees feel valued and their needs are taken care of, they are more likely to stay with the organization. The CEO’s primary job is cultivating a corporate culture that benefits all employees and customers. If you build a company and a product or service that delivers high levels of customer satisfaction, and if you spend responsibly and manage your human capital assets well, the other external manifestations of success, like market valuation and revenge growth, will follow.

 

Many companies have adopted the idea that employees are also customers of the organization, and the basic marketing strategies can be directed at them. The products that the organization has to offer its employees are a job (with assorted benefits) and quality of work life. To determine whether the job and work-life needs of employees are being met, organizations conduct periodic internal marketing research to assess employee satisfaction and needs. Become the best place to work by doing the following:

  • Treating employees as customers;
  • Using employee input and a fact-based approach for decision-making in the design and implementation of human resources policies, programs, and processes.
  • Measuring employee satisfaction and trying to continuously improve the workplace environment.
  • Benchmarking and incorporating best practices.

 

My Consultancy–Asif J. Mir – Management Consultant–transforms organizations where people have the freedom to be creative, a place that brings out the best in everybody–an open, fair place where people have a sense that what they do matters. For details please visit www.asifjmir.com, Line of Sight