Context Learning


Companies that retain employees for new technology have an interest in minimizing the number who fail. Some companies have observed that the success of retraining is greater when trainees know beforehand what jobs they will be occupying, inside or outside the firm, and when they are familiar with the new work unit, its supervisor, and its employees. Accordingly, these companies help trainees acquire this context learning as early as possible.

For example, employees in declining jobs are told as much as possible about the new opportunities arising within the company, so that they can make informed choices. Or, retrainees are assigned to “mentors” from the work units that will employ them. Or, the retrainees’ current and future supervisors accept responsibility for monitoring their programs. Or, best of all, retrainees are transferred to their new work units either before or shortly after the start of the retraining process.

My Consultancy–Asif J. Mir – Management Consultant–transforms organizations where people have the freedom to be creative, a place that brings out the best in everybody–an open, fair place where people have a sense that what they do matters. For details please visit www.asifjmir.com, and my Lectures.

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The Androgynous Manager


Clearly, the corporate world is still a man’s world. Under this male-bastion model, corporations, for a number of reasons, are losing out as much as women. Every corporation wants the most competent people woking on their side. But companies which permit themselves the luxury of unconsciously sexist attitudes lose out on a wealth of talent which resides equally in men and women. That is simply bad for business.

 When women and men are segregated in the workplace, formulating stereotype of each other’s behavior, they can become blind to genuine abilities each possesses. Women, for example, are rarely considered great-deal-makers.

 But women are actually more flexible, less deceptive, more emphatic, and more likely to reach agreement, while men are just the opposite. When a man visualizes a negotiating situation, he sees it as a one-shot deal to win or lose, like a sport or a game. A woman sees it as part of a long-term relationship. Since most business situations involve long-term relationships, the female approach is more productive.

 But in the information society, as the manager’s role shifts to that of the teacher, mentor, and nurturer of human potential, there is even more reason for corporations to take advantage of women’s managerial abilities, because these people-oriented traits are the ones women are socialized to possess.

 The problem is that most women feel that they must be more like men if they are too succeed in a male-dominated corporate environment and that is a mistake both for women and for companies.

 The appropriate style for the manager of the 80s was an androgynous blend, one that combined the best of traditional male and female traits.

 Men and women should learn from one another without abandoning successful traits they already possess. Men can learn to be more collaborative and intuitive, yet remain result-oriented. Women need not give up being nurturing in order to learn to be comfortable with power and conflict. Women can transform the workplace by expressing, not by giving up their personal values.

 My Consultancy–Asif J. Mir – Management Consultant–transforms organizations where people have the freedom to be creative, a place that brings out the best in everybody–an open, fair place where people have a sense that what they do matters. For details please visit www.asifjmir.com, Line of Sight

What will other people think?


Everyone wants the approval of other people. This is a basic need of human nature. Before doing anything—deciding what to wear, decorating the home, buying a car, or accepting a job—many people ask theselves, “what will my friends say?” “Will they approve?” Most people fear doing anything they feel may shock, offend or upset others.

 

The easy way to deal with the will-other-people-approvre? Fear is to adhere to strict conformity. But living your life to conform to other people’s likes, dislikes, and prejudices stunts your development. Conformists deny themselves individuality, and ingredient you must have to enjoy success.

 

Here are two suggestions to beat the do-other-people-approve? fear:

  1. If what you want to do meets moral and legal standards, do it! Your life is your life. Friends who criticize what you do aren’t really friends. Chances are the people who think your behavior should always meet their standards won’t be there when you need money, a job, or help. And the folks who want you to think and act the way they do would delight in seeing you fail or get into some kind of trouble. Remember this: People who expect you to conform to their way of viewing things are themselves very insecure.
  2. Seek the approval of people you admire most. Select a mentor. Instead of asking, “what will other people think?” ask, Would the most successful person I know approve of what I have in mind?” Think and do as successful people think and do.

 

My Consultancy–Asif J. Mir – Management Consultant–transforms organizations where people have the freedom to be creative, a place that brings out the best in everybody–an open, fair place where people have a sense that what they do matters. For details please visit www.asifjmir.com, Line of Sight