Travel Stress


We travel to get to work, we travel during our work, and we travel to get to distant meetings. Travel comes in all forms: short and long timeframes and short and long distances. For most people, the commonest hurdle is the daily grind to and from work. This is most acute in large cities. The problems are truly international, but some of the ugliest and best-studied traffic jams are now everywhere.

The levels of stress that this brings are extremely significant. For those who handle it poorly, it can be damaging  to their health, and may even endanger the lives of others. Medically, we know that stress mechanisms all fire at once when the body identifies a crisis. Adrenaline pours out, the stomach shuts down, the pulse races, and the hair stands up on end. The blood pressure soars, muscles clench in spasms around the shoulder tips and jaw,  and primal aggressions rise, ready for fight or flight.

With immediate flight brings out of the question, more and more frustrated drivers are turning to the fight option—either inside their cars as they tip at the heels of slower drivers, or outside their cars, where they may stomp up and beat a dent into the roof of an offending vehicle. Even the mild and polite become aggressive when they strap themselves into their bumper cars to drive to work. This means they usually arrive late, enraged and spent before they even start to face the day’s stresses on the job.

My Consultancy–Asif J. Mir – Management Consultant–transforms organizations where people have the freedom to be creative, a place that brings out the best in everybody–an open, fair place where people have a sense that what they do matters. For details please visit www.asifjmir.com, and my Lectures.

Advertisements

Inter-Cultural Communication


Companies face special challenges when they market their products and services to people in other countries and to people in their home countries who come from other cultures:

  • Companies have to make their communications understandable and clear to their target audiences. The company that does not modify its information risks offending its audience and losing the opportunity to do business.
  • Companies are ethically obligated not to reinforce patterns of discrimination in product information.
  • Companies are not obligated to challenge the prevailing prejudice directly. Organizations that actively oppose discrimination are acting admirably.

My Consultancy–Asif J. Mir – Management Consultant–transforms organizations where people have the freedom to be creative, a place that brings out the best in everybody–an open, fair place where people have a sense that what they do matters. For details please visit www.asifjmir.com, and my Lectures.

The Constraints of Techno-stress


More than at any time in the history of our species, we are facing exploding levels of computerization and complication in our lives. Some of this seems beyond human control; for example, never being able to get through on the fax number because the system is programmed to the wrong mode. Offended by such a machine, many people naturally demand some satisfaction. Often a harmless oath, perhaps accompanied by a stiff thump, will satisfy our base urge for revenge.

On occasion, sterner punishments have been meted out. Childish retaliations against technology are doomed, and are wasteful of our limited time on this planet.

Of course, a lot of the techno-stress we encounter is self-inflicted by our unbridled love of gadget. With an array of office machines and household tools that would make the original James Bond seem a technological peasant, the average worker has invited a host of unnecessary mechanical inconveniences and breakdowns into his or her life to add to the overall levels of techno-stress.

My Consultancy–Asif J. Mir – Management Consultant–transforms organizations where people have the freedom to be creative, a place that brings out the best in everybody–an open, fair place where people have a sense that what they do matters. For details please visit www.asifjmir.com, and my Lectures.

What will other people think?


Everyone wants the approval of other people. This is a basic need of human nature. Before doing anything—deciding what to wear, decorating the home, buying a car, or accepting a job—many people ask theselves, “what will my friends say?” “Will they approve?” Most people fear doing anything they feel may shock, offend or upset others.

 

The easy way to deal with the will-other-people-approvre? Fear is to adhere to strict conformity. But living your life to conform to other people’s likes, dislikes, and prejudices stunts your development. Conformists deny themselves individuality, and ingredient you must have to enjoy success.

 

Here are two suggestions to beat the do-other-people-approve? fear:

  1. If what you want to do meets moral and legal standards, do it! Your life is your life. Friends who criticize what you do aren’t really friends. Chances are the people who think your behavior should always meet their standards won’t be there when you need money, a job, or help. And the folks who want you to think and act the way they do would delight in seeing you fail or get into some kind of trouble. Remember this: People who expect you to conform to their way of viewing things are themselves very insecure.
  2. Seek the approval of people you admire most. Select a mentor. Instead of asking, “what will other people think?” ask, Would the most successful person I know approve of what I have in mind?” Think and do as successful people think and do.

 

My Consultancy–Asif J. Mir – Management Consultant–transforms organizations where people have the freedom to be creative, a place that brings out the best in everybody–an open, fair place where people have a sense that what they do matters. For details please visit www.asifjmir.com, Line of Sight