Managing Difficult Subordinates


Ask the individual to manage a group of subordinates who are extraordinary. Such subordinates would include those who are especially bright, technically advanced, and extremely intelligent. Difficult subordinates may also include problem performers, those with high potential but low actual performance, and employees with attitude problems.

My Consultancy–Asif J. Mir – Management Consultant–transforms organizations where people have the freedom to be creative, a place that brings out the best in everybody–an open, fair place where people have a sense that what they do matters. For details please visit www.asifjmir.com, and my Lectures.

Star Performers


Star Performers are people with the right combination of skills. Four categories of potential star performers can be highlighted:

  • Highly trained specialists – found in large numbers in high technology industries such as computing or those with intensive research and development such as pharmaceuticals. In the case of retailing, finance, distribution and administration are highlighted specialist areas.
  • Good managers and leaders – such as retail group managers.
  • Sales and marketing people – who are able to acquire business.
  • Hybrids – individuals with the potential to cross over from a specialism, such as human resources, into general management.

My Consultancy–Asif J. Mir – Management Consultant–transforms organizations where people have the freedom to be creative, a place that brings out the best in everybody–an open, fair place where people have a sense that what they do matters. For details please visit www.asifjmir.com, and my Lectures.

 

The Best are never Satisfied


Like great artists and athletes, all the top performers know they cannot stand still for long. They always look for ways to improve. They really don’ think they’ll ever be satisfied. Once you think you’re where you want to be, you’re not there any more. The greatest challenge you have as you become successful is never to rest on your laurels, never to feel like you’ve done it. The minute you feel like you’ve done it that’s the beginning of the end.

My Consultancy–Asif J. Mir – Management Consultant–transforms organizations where people have the freedom to be creative, a place that brings out the best in everybody–an open, fair place where people have a sense that what they do matters. For details please visit www.asifjmir.com, and my Lectures.

Breaking through the Ceiling


‘Average thinking’ not only leads managers away from excellence and away from their top performers. There is one final, and perhaps most damaging, way in which it harms a manager’s best efforts. ‘Average thinking’ actively limits performance.

Great managers, with their unique talents and styles, will have devised their own routes to excellence. But despite their success, it is still a shame that they have had to waste so much creativity maneuvering around performance evaluation schemes that unwittingly place a ceiling on performance. It is still a shame that they have had to exert so much energy railing against ‘average thinking.’ This energy and creativity would be much more valuable in the unfettered pursuit of excellence.

However, if you face the same ‘average thinking,’ you should rail against it just as energetically. Define excellence vividly, quantitatively. Paint a picture for your most talented employees of what excellence looks like. Keep everyone pushing and pushing toward the right-hand edge of the bell curve. It’s fairer. It’s more productive. And, most of all, it’s much more fun.

My Consultancy–Asif J. Mir – Management Consultant–transforms organizations where people have the freedom to be creative, a place that brings out the best in everybody–an open, fair place where people have a sense that what they do matters. For details please visit www.asifjmir.com, and my Lectures.

Feedback


People must receive feedback. Unless they know how well they are doing in fulfilling their responsibilities and meeting the standards, they cannot be expected to improve their performance when needed.

Many managers don’t get feedback because they think people know without being told when they are doing a poor job or a good job. The manager who makes this assumption knows very little about human nature. Most people have a limited capacity to judge and evaluate their own performance and work. They need help in seeing their strengths and weaknesses. That goes for the excellent performance as well as for the poor performer.

People need to know when they are doing a superb job and when they need to improve and make changes. When they don’t receive feedback, they become preoccupied with the question of how well they are doing. Are they going to get zapped or praised? Are they on the manager’s good list or bad? Are they going to get promoted or fired? These are difficult questions for anyone to live with.

When people don’t receive the necessary feedback, they feel unnoticed, unappreciated, and uncertain. They usually find a way of getting some form of attention, usually negative, since that is the only thing some managers respond to.

It is impossible to establish an effective working relationship with people unless you give them feedback. There must be two-way communication if there is to be an understanding between you and the people you manage.

Whenever you give feedback to a person on his performance, it should accomplish one or more of the following objectives:

  • Reinforce positive performance.
  • Show the person how and where he needs to change and improve.
  • Motivate the person to perform better.
  • Build pride.

My Consultancy–Asif J. Mir – Management Consultant–transforms organizations where people have the freedom to be creative, a place that brings out the best in everybody–an open, fair place where people have a sense that what they do matters. For details please visit www.asifjmir.com, Lectures, Line of Sight

The Ethos of Great Managers


Smart individual performers keep getting moved into manager positions without the slightest idea of what the manager role is, let alone the ability to play it. They are sent to leadership development courses, but they come back more impressed with their mini-executive status than with the day-to-day challenges of being a good manager.

Conventional wisdom tells us that the manager role is no longer very important. Apparently managers are now an impediment to speed, flexibility, and agility. Today’s agile companies can no longer afford to employ armies of managers to shuffle papers, sign approvals, and monitor performance. They need self-reliant, self motivated, self-directed work teams. No wonder managers are first against the wall when the reengineering revolution came.

Every manager should be a leader. He must seize opportunity, using his smarts and impatience to exert his will over a fickle world. In this world, the staid little manager is a misfit. It is too quick for him, too exciting, too dangerous. He had better stay out of the way. He might get hurt.

Today’s business pressures are more intense. Companies need self-reliant employees and aggressive leaders. But all this does not diminish the importance of managers. In turbulent times the manager is more important than ever because managers play a vital and distinct role, a role that charismatic leaders and self-directed teams are incapable of playing. The manager role is to reach inside each employee and release his unique talents into performance. This role is best played one employee at a time: one manager asking questions of, listening to, and working with one employee. Multiplied a thousand fold, this one-by-one role is the company’s power supply. In times of great change it is this role that makes the company robust enough to stay focused when needed, yet robust enough to flex without breaking.

Thus the manager role is the catalyst role. As with all catalysts, the manager’s function is to speed up the reaction between two substances, thus creating the desired end product. Specifically the manager creates performance in each employee by speeding up the reaction between the employee’s talents and the company’s goals, and between the employee’s talents and the customers’ needs. When hundreds of managers play this role well, the company becomes strong.

In today’s slimmed-down business world, most of these managers also shoulder other responsibilities. They are expected to be subject matter experts, individual superstars, and sometimes leaders in their own right. These are important roles, which great managers execute with varying styles and degrees of success. But when it comes to the manager aspect of the responsibilities, great managers all excel at this catalyst role.

My Consultancy–Asif J. Mir – Management Consultant–transforms organizations where people have the freedom to be creative, a place that brings out the best in everybody–an open, fair place where people have a sense that what they do matters. For details please contact www.asifjmir.com, Line of Sight