Managing the Sales Process


Sales management, most sales managers would agree, is part art and part science. The art of sales management consists of insight into human nature and motivation and sensitivity to the needs of your salespeople, knowing when to cajole, when to praise, when to push, and when to back off.

 There is a great deal however that canm be said about the scientific or the technical aspects of sales management. In particular, there are some important points that need to be made about how sales force automation technology provides important tools for sales managers to control these aspects. In fact, for most sales managers, this could very well be most important.

 A primary determining factor for success in sales is the activity level of salespeople. In other words, sales is a numbers game. Of course, it is true that in any sales force there will be varying skill levels, and there will always by some salespeople who are better than others.but when we say that one salesperson is better than other, what we are really saying is that that individual’s percentages are better, that his or her close ratio is better, that his or her average sale is larger. There is no salesperson who is so terrible that he or she cannot sell anything; there is no salesperson who is so good that he or sher does not strike out periodically. It is all a questio of numbers.

 My Consultancy–Asif J. Mir – Management Consultant–transforms organizations where people have the freedom to be creative, a place that brings out the best in everybody–an open, fair place where people have a sense that what they do matters. For details please visit www.asifjmir.com, Line of Sight

The primacy of Internal Marketing


Internal marketing is the conceptual process by which managers actively encourage, stimulate, and support employee commitment to the company, the company’s goods and services, and the company’s customers. Emphasis should be placed on continual. Managers, who consistently pitch into help when needed, constantly provide encouragement and words of praise to employees, strive to help employees understand the benefits of performing their jobs well, and emphasize the importance of employee actions on both company and employee results are practitioners of internal marketing. In service marketing, successful internal marketing efforts, leading to employee commitment to service quality, are key to success.

Properly performed customer satisfaction research can yield a wealth of strategic information about customers, the sponsoring company, and competitors. However, service quality goes beyond the relationship between a customer and a company. Rather, it is personal relationship between a customer and the particular employee that the customer happens to be dealing with at the time of the service encounter that ultimately determines service quality. The importance of having customer-oriented, frontline people cannot be overstated. If frontline service personnel are unfriendly, unhelpful, uncooperative, or uninterested in the customer, the customer will tend to project that same attitude to the company as a whole. The character and personality of an organization reflects the character and personality of its top management. Management must develop programs that will stimulate employee commitment to customer service. These programs must contain five critical components:

1) A careful selection process in hiring frontline employees. To do this, management has to clearly define the skills the service person must bring to the job.

2) A clear, concrete message that conveys particular service strategy that frontline people can bring to act on. People delivering service need to know how their work fits in the broader scheme of business operations. They need to have a cause because servicing others is just too demanding and frustrating to be done well each day without one.

3) Significant modeling by managers, that is, managers demonstrating the behavior that they intend to reward employees for performing.

4) An energetic follow-through process, in which managers provide the training, support, and incentives necessary to give the employees the capability and willingness to provide quality service.

5) An emphasis on teaching employees to have good attitudes. This type of training usually focuses on specific social techniques, such as, eye contact, smiling, tone of voice, and standards of dress.

However, organizing and implementing such programs will only lead to temporary results unless managers practice a strategy of internal marketing.

My Consultancy–Asif J. Mir – Management Consultant–transforms organizations where people have the freedom to be creative, a place that brings out the best in everybody–an open, fair place where people have a sense that what they do matters. For details please contact www.asifjmir.com, Line of Sight

When Managers don’t feed Ego


When people in an organization are never praised, never complimented, and are routinely criticized, negative results always occur. Sabotage and psychological terrorism is not confined to offices and factories. Professionals in other organizations also get even when they feel unappreciated, exploited, and psychologically abused.

 

The worst strikes, often prolonged and sometimes violent, occur in industries where managers fail to consider workers as people with strong and deep ego-needs. Managers in these industries typically regard employees with no more emotion than steel, cement, or some other commodity. Interestingly, moat strikes take place owing to psychological neglect of employees’ egos.

 

My Consultancy–Asif J. Mir – Management Consultant–transforms organizations where people have the freedom to be creative, a place that brings out the best in everybody–an open, fair place where people have a sense that what they do matters. For details please contact www.asifjmir.com, Line of Sight

Warping Higher Customer Satisfaction


You can improve your management of others to enable you to deliver higher customer satisfaction:

  1. Listen to other people around you,  no matter what their experience or lack of it and listen without judgment–every opinion is a valid one. If you hear two or three ideas together they can often spark a fourth, which you wouldn’t have arrived at if you’d heard them with a judgment.
  2. Use praise. Use praise more frequently and more sincerely than you’ve ever done in the past. Every night when you go home, if you’re a manager or even if you are not, ask yourself have I said thank you? to three people for three different things today? If you haven’t, it either means one of two things: that no body that you work with, or for, has actually done anything which is worth saying thank you for , or that they have done things of note but you haven’t noticed.
  3. If you can’t say something positive, don’t say anything. If you went into a meeting with your manager and they ran through a list of 20 things that they were pleased with and just as you were leaving they delivered one negative criticism, the chances are that this is the one thought that would stay with you, the other 20 would disappear in the length and shadow of the negative criticism. Negative criticism has virtually no practical application. If you have to say something then think it through and put it into a positive context. Remember that people will normally do the best they can with what they have. If they are not doing the best that they can, then you need to help them to see what can be done and what talents, resources, or alternatives exist for the.
  4. Always be seen to be fair and honest. If there’s one thing that can demotivate staff and people around you quicker than almost anything, it is people having favorites.
  5. Share your concerns. Managing a customer service team, an organization, or being an entrepreneur is not an easy job. Whilst you need to be decisive and have confidence and courage that inspires people, there is much to be gained from being open and sharing your own hopes, dreams and concerns.  One of the things that people often like in working in a small business, perhaps one which has an entrepreneurial flair to it, is the enthusiaism and the sheer energy that those people can put into theirday and they do, every signle day. Remind people what you’re doing, where you’re going and why you do what you do.
  6. Become a teacher. Instead of finding fault, managing by exception, and pointing out where people are going wrong, become obsessed with helping people become twice as good as they are now. If you manage people, or you aspire to manage or lead people, then your goal should be to make sure thatas quickly as possible they can do their job twice as well as they’re doing it now, even if it means them being promoting or leaving. There is nothing more satisfying than seeing other people around you do well, especially if you know you’ve contributed to that. Don’t ask yourself what can I do for myself?  Instead, ask yourself, how can I help my team become a better team?  Take a few minutes at regular intervals, at random times during the day if necessary, and teach people different ways of doing things–upgrade their skills, explain different aspects of the business, formalize it–put together different training programs so that people, over a period of time, will really move forward in both their skills, their knowledge and their habits.
  7. Kiesin is a Japanese word that has no equivalent in the English language. It roughly translates as constant and never ending improvement.  The Japanese philosophy is to do a thousand things one percent better not one thing a thousand percent better. This means that everybody that you work with–every supplier, every employee, and every manager, everybody in the customer satisfaction value chain–should be constantly required to innovate, to improve and suggest ideas. Coming up with ways to improve how things are done, should  almost become a mandatory part of any job.
  8. Develop yourself. If there’s one way that you can get other people to become more interested and more focused on improving themselves, it is to lead by example. Take time out to go on training courses, even though you masy be too busy. Take time to read useful information, not just novels, books or newspapers but actual up-to-date books and tesxts from the experts within your industry. Practise your skills, use them and make sure that they’re developed as far as they possibly can be. If it means learning a new language or learning a skill that you don’t have then take on the challenge. It is very difficult to manage people well if you have low self esteem but if you feel good about yourself and you have that feeling of progress and achievement, then it is very hard for this not to rub off on other people.
  9. Only do the most important things. Ask yourself that question or a version of it every single minute of the day:Is what I’m doing now helping directly or indirectly to increase the number and quality of the customers our organization has? Because if it doesn’t affect the customer, it shouldn’t be done.

My Consultancy–Asif J. Mir – Management Consultant–transformserorganizations where people have the freedom to be creative, a place that brings out the best in everybody–an open, fair place where people have a sense that what they do matters. For details please contact Asif J. Mir

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