Defining Issues & Priorities


Ensure that the key issues facing business have been realistically defined in light of the current and rapidly changing business environment. There is nothing new about this requirement, but the fact is that very few management teams actually take the time and apply the discipline necessary to objectively define and prioritize the key issues that can make or break their business. The issues of inferior quality, higher cost products, lower productivity, and nonresponsive service plague manufacturers for the better part of the recent past. Many companies in industries such as steel, automotive, machine tool, textile, farm and construction equipment suffer badly as a result. Only few companies address these issues in effective ways. Most are unable to clearly identify the key issues, set priorities, and develop the necessary business plans to overcome the underlying problems.

While the specific issues vary for different companies and industries, the management mindset should not vary. To deal effectively with an increasingly turbulent environment, priorities must be set so the business can survive unexpected blows, adapt to sudden dropping changes, and then capitalize on smaller windows of opportunity that develop and close much more quickly than they have in the past.

Many progressive managers kick off their planning process with a session aimed specifically at getting agreement on key issues and priorities. Accepting these priorities require a shift in the way most managers think and act, such as:

  • Liquidity becomes a more important objective, often more important than reported earnings. It provides the flexibility to deal more effectively with unexpected events than is possible when everything is tied up in fixed and slow moving assets.
  • Productivity gains per dollar of capital and per employee must be achieved annually. These reductions must exceed inflation and achieve demonstrably lower costs.
  • Innovation must never stop. Demonstrable product and process improvements must be achieved year after year.
  • All cycle and response times must be continuously reduced.
  • A “frightened” sense of urgency must be the way of life in all parts of the business.

My Consultancy–Asif J. Mir – Management Consultant–transforms organizations where people have the freedom to be creative, a place that brings out the best in everybody–an open, fair place where people have a sense that what they do matters. For details please visit www.asifjmir.com, and my Lectures.

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Bid Decision-Making


Following tools and techniques are used:

  1. Risk Assessment: Sellers must identify, analyze, and prioritize the risks associated with a potential project. Many world-class companies have developed practical risk assessment tools—surveys, checklists, models, and reports-containing both qualitative and quantitative information. Software programs are increasingly being developed to help managers assess risks.
  2. Opportunity Assessment: Sellers must identify and analyze the opportunities that are potentially viable. Many successful companies have developed standard forms, surveys, checklists, or models to help managers assess opportunity.
  3. Risk Management Team Process: Sound business management requires a solid understanding of risks and the methods to identify, analyze, and mitigate them. Successful companies follow a designated risk management team process, not just a best guess individual assessment.

My Consultancy–Asif J. Mir – Management Consultant–transforms organizations where people have the freedom to be creative, a place that brings out the best in everybody–an open, fair place where people have a sense that what they do matters. For details please visit www.asifjmir.com, and my Lectures.

Benefits of Quality Function Deployment


Focus on Customer

  • Focus mainly on customer needs and wants.
  • Compare their product with competitors.
  • Prioritize according to customer’s level of importance.
  • Identify the vital item to be acted upon.

Time Saving

  • Enables to change the design in the starting itself.
  • Limits the problems after introduction of the product.
  • Gives opportunities for future applications.
  • Reduce the time for redesigning since all changes are made in first step itself.

Encourages teamwork

  • Based on everyone’ ideas
  • Creates communication at interfaces.
  • Team members are recognized.

Success depends on:

  • Quality consciousness of each member.
  • Prevailing team spirit.
  • Correctness of customer requirements.
  • Knowledge of members on management tools.
  • Knowledge of members on process details.

My Consultancy–Asif J. Mir – Management Consultant–transforms organizations where people have the freedom to be creative, a place that brings out the best in everybody–an open, fair place where people have a sense that what they do matters. For details please visit www.asifjmir.com, and my Lectures.

Primitive Organizations


Primitive organizations exhibit all the classic features of any start-up. Energy and anticipation are usually high and the right startup can almost run on pure adrenalin.

Primitive organizations naturally perform the things that other types of organizations have to work hard to achieve. Formal structure and communication is not yet necessary, as enthusiasm and team spirit can carry the organization along.

In the early stages most primitive organizations manage to operate under one working culture and build effective internal and external relationships. This state of affairs can’t last, however, as primitive organizations are naturally transient. When the initial honeymoon period passes, the culture of the organization will change of its own accord.

All that is up for debate is how much it will change, how fast it will change and whether that change will be managed or if nature will be allowed to take its own course.

As is the case with all organizations, primitive organizations face the choice of managing their culture from the word go, or leaving it to chance. Unfortunately too many organizations rely on the natural spirit associated with being a primitive startup and de-prioritize cultural investment, choosing to concentrate on what they see as operational necessities.

To a point this is understandable, but this attitude reflects some common misconceptions.

  • An organization’s honeymoon period or primitive stage can be incredibly short, which catches a lot of organizations out – and once the damage is done, it’s done. Remedial work is always harder and significantly more draining and time-consuming than positive effort.
  • Proactive cultural and relationship management right from the start can be achieved at minimal cost in terms of time and money, and will deliver benefit for years to come. It is worth remembering that managing a working culture does not mean over-engineering it: in fact, it should mean quite the opposite. Good practice from day one is what creates long-term amazing relationships and long-term success.

My Consultancy–Asif J. Mir – Management Consultant–transforms organizations where people have the freedom to be creative, a place that brings out the best in everybody–an open, fair place where people have a sense that what they do matters. For details please visit www.asifjmir.com, and my Lectures.

Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA)


“It is always better to be prepared and prevent rather than to repair and repent.” This is a quotation which emphasizes preventive techniques.

World is ever changing. People went better from good and best from better. Industry people have also begun to think of different approaches to satisfy the customer. They have now come to the stage of finding out the methods to prevent a problem rather than ‘finding out a solution to a problem’ and finding out methods to eliminate waste from monitoring of waste.

Failure mode and effect analysis is one of the tools of total quality management which helps in finding out the possible failure modes of a design, product, process or service and setting up ways to prevent their occurrence.

FMEA is a proactive tool which is used to foresee the probable failures that can occur at a later stage. This forces one to analyze critically each and every process with the sole aim of identifying problems that may emerge.

  • A failure mode and effect analysis is an engineering technique used to define, identify and eliminate known and/or potential failures, problems, errors and so on from the system, design, process and/or service before they reach the customer.
  • The FMEA will identify corrective actions required to prevent failures from reaching the customer, thereby assuring the highest durability, quality and reliability possible in a product or service.

FMEA involves:

  • Identifying known and potential failure mode;
  • Identifying cause and effect of each failure mode;
  • Prioritizing the failure mode according to Risk Priority Number;
  • Finding out preventive action for failure mode.

My Consultancy–Asif J. Mir – Management Consultant–transforms organizations where people have the freedom to be creative, a place that brings out the best in everybody–an open, fair place where people have a sense that what they do matters. For details please visit www.asifjmir.com, Line of Sight

Change and Transformation Losers


Losers adopt a combination of attitudes, approaches and priorities, from a limited vision and a short-term and internal orientation, through cutting corners, to attempts to protect corporate interests, and this locks them into a ‘spiral of descent’. The almost inevitable outcome of their actions and inaction is a struggle to remain viable as a supplier of low-margin commodity work.

Losers become reactive and defensive, get lost in complexity of labyrinthine proportions and the more activities they engage in to break free, the more they become entangled. They introduce changes for changes’ sake. They become neutralized by their lack of imagination and entangled in barbed wire created by their own words and actions. The trick they try to play is to retire or to move on at a high point.

Losers in the battle to become and remain competitive:

·        are ‘in their own space’ and relatively oblivious to the needs of others; they do not anticipate and remain unaware of significant external developments and pressing requirements to change;

  • lack self-confidence and self-worth and hold back, they are different, can be indicative and find it difficult to commit themselves;
  • do not have a compelling rationale and purpose; they are not unique, special or even distinctive;
  • are not noticed by people, they are grey and dull, and hence fail to stand out or have an impact;
  • copy and follow others; they do not innovate or differentiate  themselves from their competitors;
  • respond to events; they react to incoming approaches and invitations to tender;
  • do not prioritize and focus; they fail to address what is important as a result of being distracted by trivia;
  • hoard information and hold on to the reigns of power; they are reluctant to delegate and to trust and involve others;
  • remunerate people according to their seniority and status in the management hierarchy;
  • are driven by internal personal goals and corporate targets rather than by customer requirements;
  • play other people’s games rather than live on their own terms; they become pawns on other people’s chessboards;
  • adopt standard approaches and are rigid and inflexible;
  • follow fashions and have a penchant for fads;
  • search for panaceas and single solutions;
  • define their capabilities in terms of the tangible assets they own and the people they employ;
  • are consumers rather than producers of knowledge, understanding  and intellectual capital;
  • respond unimaginatively and mechanically to business opportunities;
  • rely on traditional ‘hard-self’ techniques and undertake win-lose negotiations;
  • make little effort to learn from either their experience or that of others;
  • hold back and stay aloof; they avoid personal commitments, partnering  arrangements and inter-organizational links;
  • are selfish in relationships and put the minimum of effort into maintaining them;
  • use their customers to achieve their own short-term objectives;
  • are cautious and half hearted in their approach to e-business;
  • mouth generalizations and they indulge in self-deception and spin;
  • live for the moment; they have short time horizons;
  • do little to keep competitors out of their key accounts;
  • leave the building of customer relationships to specialist sales staff;
  • ignore organizations that are supplied by competitors;
  • prize their freedom and independence, they prefer to operate alone;
  • attempt to protect their interests with small print and avoid the assumption and sharing of risks;
  • are secretive and defensive; they build internal and external barriers to create a hard shell;
  • offer other employees general training and development that is viewed as a cost;
  • fail to equip their people to win new business, create new offerings or build customer relationships;
  • are complacent and set in their ways; they are reluctant to think, question and learn;
  • confuse the roles of owner-shareholder, manager and director;
  • fail to distinguish between operational matters and strategic issues;
  • become typecast and locked into certain roles; they tend to end up as commodity suppliers.

My Consultancy–Asif J. Mir – Management Consultant–transforms organizations where people have the freedom to be creative, a place that brings out the best in everybody–an open, fair place where people have a sense that what they do matters. For details please contact http://www.asifjmir.com