Ethical Expectations and Public Values


Ethical expectations are a vital part of the business environment. The public expects business to be ethical and wants corporate managers to apply ethical principles—in other words, guidelines about what is right and wrong, fair and unfair, and morally correct—when they make business decisions.

In the global arena, ethical standards—and even what is meant by ethics—can vary from one society to another. In spite of differences in ethical meanings, cultural variation does not automatically rule out common ethical agreement being reached among people of different societies.

Human rights issues have become more prominent and important for business. For many years that pressure was exerted on South Africa’s political leaders to halt racially discriminatory practices of apartheid and its business leaders to challenge the South African government’s enforcement of the policy.

The question is not, ‘Should business be ethical?’ nor is it, ‘Should business be economically different?’ Society wants business to be both at the same time. Ethical behavior is a key aspect of corporate social performance. To maintain public support and credibility—that is, business legitimacy—businesses must find ways to balance and integrate these two social demands: high economic performance and high ethical standards. When a company and its employees act ethically in dealings with other stakeholders, they are improving the organization’s contribution as a social actor. When they fail to act ethically, there is the risk of losing the public support an organization needs to be credible and successful.

Business leaders are faced with the continuing challenge of meeting public expectations that are, themselves, always changing. Yesterday’s acceptable behavior may not be tolerated today. Many forms of harassment and discrimination were once common. Today, however, social standards make such actions unacceptable. Public expectations of service and ethical behavior are as relevant to a business as customer expectations regarding products such as automobiles and computers.

My Consultancy–Asif J. Mir – Management Consultant–transforms organizations where people have the freedom to be creative, a place that brings out the best in everybody–an open, fair place where people have a sense that what they do matters. For details please visit www.asifjmir.com, and my Lectures.

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Consumers of Advertising


It is vital, from the outset, to guard against the normal psychological tendency to impose your advertising “pattern” on a rather complex reality. Consider, for example, that the advertisements you may encounter through television, radio, the campus newspaper, magazines, direct mail, billboards, and the like are only a fraction of all the forms that advertising takes in other places in other times, for different purposes, and among different audiences. Yet, there is a tendency to equate that fragmented reality with the whole. Advertising is bad (good) for children; advertising is good (bad) for the economy; advertising helps us make wise (unwise) purchase decisions; advertising makes goods cost more (less); and so on. Simply, some advertising may be (or do) any of these things. All advertising is however far too complex to permit such over-simplifications.

By way of further example, one of the frequently voiced complaints of advertising critics is that advertising is not informative enough. Now, if we wish to point to some specific advertisements, it would not be difficult to accept such a premise. An advertisement for an expensive car may tell us that the car offers greater “class” than its competitors but nothing of its performance or life expectancy. Or a message for a cereal may feature a talking tiger, telling us of his adventures, but little of nutrition.

But there is other grist for this mill as well. A classified ad for a refrigerator may tell us its make, age, capacity, operating efficiency, and the reasons the seller has put it on the market. A message on drill bits for all rigs inundates its readers with performance data concerning the cost efficiencies to be accrued through the use of this bit compared with those of traditional composition. Do these ads also lack information?

To understand advertising then, you must first develop some knowledge of its more prominent functions. One way of getting a realistic picture of the landscape of advertising is to ask a simple question: Who uses advertising to reach what audiences through what media for what purpose? The pursuit of the answer not, of course, reveals all the nuances of advertising. It may, however, after a reasonable of some of the major species and subspecies and—not incidentally—serve to discourage embracing, “Advertising does …” thinking.

My Consultancy–Asif J. Mir – Management Consultant–transforms organizations where people have the freedom to be creative, a place that brings out the best in everybody–an open, fair place where people have a sense that what they do matters. For details please visit www.asifjmir.com, Line of Sight

The Shift to Customer Service


You may wonder what, exactly, caused the economic shift to service away from manufacturing. Some of the more prominent reasons are described herebelow:

  • Increased efficiency in technology. Because of the development and improvement of machines and computers, production and quality have increased. Two resulting side effects have been an increased need for service industries to care for the technology, and a decrease in manufacturing.
  • Globalization of the economy: Beginning in the 1960s, when worldwide trade barriers were lowered, a variety of factors have contributed to expanded international cooperation and competition. Since that time, advances in technology, communications, diplomacy, and transportation have opened new markets and allowed decentralized worldwide access for production, sales, and service.
  • Deregulation of many industries: the 1970s saw deregulation of industries (e.g., airlines, telephone) alongwith oil embargoes and political unrest (Vietnam, Iran) reducing US competition while allowing other countries free access to those areas of the world. The rapid deregulation of major US public services, competition (with an emphasis on providing service excellence) has flourished.
  • More women entering the workforce: Because more women are in the workplace, many of the traditional roles in society have shifted out of necessity or convenience to service providers.
  • Desire to better use leisure time: More than ever, workers of developed nations enjoy increasing amounts of leisure time. This has heightened a desire to relax, enjoy children, and do other things they value—people want to use their free time in more personally satisfying ways. To accomplish this, they now rely more heavily on service industries to maintain their desired lifestyles.
  • Expectation of quality service: Most customers expect that they will receive a quality product or service. If their expectations are not met, customers simply pick up the phone to call or visit a competing company where they can receive what they think they paid for. This created a need for more and better trained customer service professionals.
  • Better educated customers: Not only are customers more highly educated, they are also well informed about price, quality, and value of products and services. This has occurred in part because of advertising and publicity by companies competing for market share by the activity of consumer information and advocacy groups.

 My Consultancy–Asif J. Mir – Management Consultant–transforms organizations where people have the freedom to be creative, a place that brings out the best in everybody–an open, fair place where people have a sense that what they do matters. For details please contact www.asifjmir.com, Line of Sight

Financial Engineering


Project financing can best be thought of as a form of asset-based financial engineering. It is asset-based because each financing is tailored around a specific asset or a related pool of assets. It involves financial engineering because, in so many cases, the financing structures cannot simply be copied from some other project. Rather, it must be crafted specifically for the project at hand.

Project financing is about the circumstances in which project financing might be beneficial to a firm’s stakeholders, and has emphasized that a project financing must be designed to serve a community of interests among several parties to a project. Consequently, no single rationale can completely explain why firms employ project financing. Clever corporate financial engineers will continue to find new applications of project financing. As the financial environment continues to evolve, project financing will enjoy a prominent place among leading successful financial techniques.

My Consultancy–Asif J. Mir – Management Consultant–transforms organizations where people have the freedom to be creative, a place that brings out the best in everybody–an open, fair place where people have a sense that what they do matters. For details please contact www.asifjmir.com, Line of Sight