Coping with Frustration


There are three general approaches to coping with frustration: 1) to ignore it, 2) to recognize it, and 3) to attack a non-related target, and a fourth is to change strategies for reaching the goal by going around the barrier, developing new skills, or acquiring new resources. The third general approach—attacking a non-related target—is normally dysfunctional and utilized by those unable or unwilling to accept their frustration and confront their sources directly.

We may respond unconsciously to frustration with one or more of a variety of psychological defences. We utilize these, usually unconsciously, to protect our self-concepts. These defences help us block all the force of more reality than we can take at a particular time. They can also be dysfunctional if they are used too frequently or block us from coping with our problems in more direct and effective ways. A desirable learning goal is to become more aware of the defenses we use and to avoid those that prevent us from dealing with our frustrations as well as we might.

Mild frustration may not lead to anger and aggression, although intense frustration always does. A more pessimistic view would imply that little can be done about choosing when and how we express our frustration. We think much can be learned.

My Consultancy–Asif J. Mir – Management Consultant–transforms organizations where people have the freedom to be creative, a place that brings out the best in everybody–an open, fair place where people have a sense that what they do matters. For details please visit www.asifjmir.com, Line of Sight

Consumers of Advertising


It is vital, from the outset, to guard against the normal psychological tendency to impose your advertising “pattern” on a rather complex reality. Consider, for example, that the advertisements you may encounter through television, radio, the campus newspaper, magazines, direct mail, billboards, and the like are only a fraction of all the forms that advertising takes in other places in other times, for different purposes, and among different audiences. Yet, there is a tendency to equate that fragmented reality with the whole. Advertising is bad (good) for children; advertising is good (bad) for the economy; advertising helps us make wise (unwise) purchase decisions; advertising makes goods cost more (less); and so on. Simply, some advertising may be (or do) any of these things. All advertising is however far too complex to permit such over-simplifications.

By way of further example, one of the frequently voiced complaints of advertising critics is that advertising is not informative enough. Now, if we wish to point to some specific advertisements, it would not be difficult to accept such a premise. An advertisement for an expensive car may tell us that the car offers greater “class” than its competitors but nothing of its performance or life expectancy. Or a message for a cereal may feature a talking tiger, telling us of his adventures, but little of nutrition.

But there is other grist for this mill as well. A classified ad for a refrigerator may tell us its make, age, capacity, operating efficiency, and the reasons the seller has put it on the market. A message on drill bits for all rigs inundates its readers with performance data concerning the cost efficiencies to be accrued through the use of this bit compared with those of traditional composition. Do these ads also lack information?

To understand advertising then, you must first develop some knowledge of its more prominent functions. One way of getting a realistic picture of the landscape of advertising is to ask a simple question: Who uses advertising to reach what audiences through what media for what purpose? The pursuit of the answer not, of course, reveals all the nuances of advertising. It may, however, after a reasonable of some of the major species and subspecies and—not incidentally—serve to discourage embracing, “Advertising does …” thinking.

My Consultancy–Asif J. Mir – Management Consultant–transforms organizations where people have the freedom to be creative, a place that brings out the best in everybody–an open, fair place where people have a sense that what they do matters. For details please visit www.asifjmir.com, Line of Sight

Psychological Safety


Complex change can create anxiety and stress. If employees do not experience psychological safety in such a scenario, they would become excessively preoccupied with maintaining their sense of competence. The task may be large, employees feel empowered. They have the decision-making authority; they can question old habits and beliefs and even challenge powerful departments. People feel themselves to be in control of their own and their organizations’ destiny. All these factors enhance psychological safety and enhance their levels of hope and optimism.

My Consultancy–Asif J. Mir – Management Consultant–transforms organizations where people have the freedom to be creative, a place that brings out the best in everybody–an open, fair place where people have a sense that what they do matters. For details please visit www.asifjmir.com, Line of Sight

Graphology


The use of graphology (handwriting analysis) assumes that handwriting reflects basic personality traits. Handwriting analysis thus has some resemblance to projective personality tests, although graphology’s validity is highly suspect.

In graphology, the handwriting analyst studies an applicant’s handwriting and signature to discover the person’s needs, desires, and psychological makeup.According to a graphologist the writing examplifies uneven pressure, poor rhythm, and unseen baselines. The variation of light and dark lines show a “lack of control” and is “one strong indicator of the writer’s inner disturbance.”

Graphology’s place in screening sometimes seems schizophrenic. Studies suggest it is generally not valid, or that when graphologists do accutrately size up candidates, it’s because they are also privy to other background information. Yet some firms continue to use graphology—indeed, to swear by it. It tends to be bigger in Europe, where “countries like France or Germany have one central graphology institute, which serves as the certifying body.”

My Consultancy–Asif J. Mir – Management Consultant–transforms organizations where people have the freedom to be creative, a place that brings out the best in everybody–an open, fair place where people have a sense that what they do matters. For details please visit www.asifjmir.com, Line of Sight

Design Jobs


Job design looks for the best way of doing any particular task. It describes the details of the work to be done, the skills and equipment needed, supervision, interactions with other questions, environment and so on. From the organization’s point of view, the aim of the job design is to make employees productive and efficient. But employees have their own social and psychological needs, and they want to interact with other people, be recognized, appreciated and properly rewarded. So the real aim of job design is to meet the performance goals of the organization, while making the job safe, satisfying and rewarding for the individual. There are elements of job design:

a)      The physical environment is the place where the job is done, its layout, the tools used, equipment available, lighting, temperature, noise, safety features and so on.

b)      The social environment,  which affects the psychological well-being of the people working. A good social environment gives a higher quality of working life, and leads to higher motivation and better performance.

c)      Work methods, which describe the details of how a job is done. Work methods usually break the job into a series of small tasks and analyses each of these. In particular, they ask questions like ‘Why is this task done?’ ‘Could it be done automatically?’ ‘How could the layout of the workplace be improved?’ ‘Would different tools help?’

 When a company (L&M Industries) involved in window frame making, looked at their process, they counted 162 separate steps. Of these, 39 involved walking to fetch materials and tools, and another 18 involved waiting for something to happen. By redesigning the jobs, L&M reduced the amount of movement by 85 percent and cut the time needed to make each frame by 58 percent.

 Such improvements need someone to recognize that changes are needed and then do the planning. This can take time. You have to design jobs properly, so that they satisfy the needs of both the organization and the employee.

 My Consultancy–Asif J. Mir – Management Consultant–transforms organizations where people have the freedom to be creative, a place that brings out the best in everybody–an open, fair place where people have a sense that what they do matters. For details please visit www.asifjmir.com, Line of Sight

Relating Price to Value


Value today is often misunderstood to mean low price or bundled price. Yet, the real essence of value revolves around the tradeoff between the benefits consumers receive from a product or service and the price that they pay. From a consumer’s point of view, price only has meaning when paired with the benefits delivered, both tangible and psychologiocal. For a given price, value increases when product or service benefits increase.

 

Value decreases when perceived benefits go down relative to price. Many companies were initially attracted to managed healthcare because of their ability to control skyrocketing healthcare costs. Yet, despite the cost savings, employees of these companies were becoming frustrated by the loss of control over their destiny.

 

Consumer value assessments are often comparative. Value judgments by consumers as to the worth and desirability of the product or service are m,ade relative to competitive substitutes that satisfy the same need. Thus, consumers determine the value of product or service based on a company’s perceived benefits and price, as well as those of a competitor’s offer.

 

My Consultancy–Asif J. Mir – Management Consultant–transforms organizations where people have the freedom to be creative, a place that brings out the best in everybody–an open, fair place where people have a sense that what they do matters. For details please visit www.asifjmir.com, Line of Sight

When Managers don’t feed Ego


When people in an organization are never praised, never complimented, and are routinely criticized, negative results always occur. Sabotage and psychological terrorism is not confined to offices and factories. Professionals in other organizations also get even when they feel unappreciated, exploited, and psychologically abused.

 

The worst strikes, often prolonged and sometimes violent, occur in industries where managers fail to consider workers as people with strong and deep ego-needs. Managers in these industries typically regard employees with no more emotion than steel, cement, or some other commodity. Interestingly, moat strikes take place owing to psychological neglect of employees’ egos.

 

My Consultancy–Asif J. Mir – Management Consultant–transforms organizations where people have the freedom to be creative, a place that brings out the best in everybody–an open, fair place where people have a sense that what they do matters. For details please contact www.asifjmir.com, Line of Sight

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