Desires and Results


When there is a gap between rhetoric and reality a change program may annoy all the interests involved:

o     The ‘haves’ with a vested interest in the status quo may feel threatened by the prospect of change.

o     The ‘have-nots’, who hope to benefit from change, may in return be disappointed by the lack of results.

o     When the rhetoric continues, those in favor of the status quo may view the lack of results as no more than a temporary relief, or calm before the storm.

o     The disappointment of the ‘have-nots’ can turn to disillusion, despair, and even a sense of betrayal, where the rhetoric has raised expectations beyond the prospects of delivery.

Managers have a tendency to follow their beliefs rather than the words. Burying your head in the sand may enable you, for a time, to avoid contemplating awkward realities. Understanding what people really believe gives you some idea of what you may be in for. Some managers may just not believe that it is going to happen.

My Consultancy–Asif J. Mir – Management Consultant–transforms organizations where people have the freedom to be creative, a place that brings out the best in everybody–an open, fair place where people have a sense that what they do matters. For details please visit www.asifjmir.com, and my Lectures.

 

Facing the Harsh Facts


Many companies that have lost profits or market share have managers who are still waiting patiently for their business to “get back to normal.” Others are looking for government help for their declining market and profit positions. Neither of these approaches is a viable situation. What is needed is less wishful thinking and rhetoric and greater willingness to squarely face the true facts about their markets and competitive positions. The demand changes that have occurred in many markets are structural, not cyclical, and it is unrealistic to expect any kind of a dramatic recovery or turnaround that will restore demand to former levels.

It is extremely difficult for managers who have built their entire careers around specific products and technology to accept the fact that their former business base has now leveled out from prior peaks, or worse yet, become obsolete or irretrievably lost to new competitors or technology. Obviously, many old-line steel managers could not imagine today’s world of aluminum cans, plastic auto parts and bodies, or Japanese, Korean, and small regional producers who constantly “beat their pants off.” Nor could managers in the high flying semiconductor business foresee the situation where their markets have not only ceased to gallop ahead, but decline dramatically, and where foreign sources, including Brazil, Korea, and Taiwan, have captured the bulk of the remaining business. Unfortunately, these are the facts, and an equally discouraging set of forces applies in many other markets.

It is understandable that managers who have grown up and lived through the growth years in any of these industries find today’s conditions difficult to accept. But they must change their myopic or unrealistic views of their business so they can tackle the hard work required to regain a profitable competitive footing. Otherwise, their situations will not improve and will most likely deteriorate further.

My Consultancy–Asif J. Mir – Management Consultant–transforms organizations where people have the freedom to be creative, a place that brings out the best in everybody–an open, fair place where people have a sense that what they do matters. For details please visit www.asifjmir.com, Line of Sight

Clear Vision and Strategy


Vision can inspire, but it can also result in disillusionment if it is incomplete or incapable of achievement. Like an idea, it may have little value outside of an organization with the capability to give it a tangible reality.

Many attempts to formulate and implement visions and missions have been naïve and in some cases destructive. A wide gulf has emerged between rhetoric and reality, and between aspiration and achievement. Instead of inspiration and motivation, there is disillusionment and distrust. The agreement of vision is often perceived as the ‘input’, rather than as an initial step on what may prove to be a long process of implementation.

Progress is made in providing distinctive purposes and offerings, and the longer term and sometimes hidden consequences of the short-term reactions of corporate boards to economic pressures. It emphasizes that changing attitudes and perspective generally takes longer than is first thought.

The lack of top management commitment and of communication skills are major barriers to change. To share a compelling vision requires new attitudes and approaches to communication.

My Consultancy–Asif J. Mir – Management Consultant–transforms organizations where people have the freedom to be creative, a place that brings out the best in everybody–an open, fair place where people have a sense that what they do matters. For details please contact www.asifjmir.com