Reinventing Leadership


Many people in today’s organizations are pretty miserable. Unhappy people don’t produce quality services and products. At some level, each one of us knows that. Yet, many leaders and managers have given up. They’ve accepted the idea that employees work forty hours a week only so they can do what they want to do on the weekend. That must be changed, and it can be changed. The realities of the deteriorating social fabric demand that we return self-esteem to workers. The realities of national and global competition demand that leaders start making a difference in their corporations—a difference that truly makes a difference.

There are better ways to run corporations than the old, autocratic, dehumanizing ways. Not only must we implement these better ways; we have to sustain them. You can’t do it with your eyes, head or heart closed. But it’s very simple stuff, and it’s very, very powerful.

My Consultancy–Asif J. Mir – Management Consultant–transforms organizations where people have the freedom to be creative, a place that brings out the best in everybody–an open, fair place where people have a sense that what they do matters. For details please visit www.asifjmir.com, and my Lectures.

Expert Power


There are several ways managers use expert power. They can promote an image of expertise by subtly making others aware of their education, experience, and accomplishments. To maintain credibility, a leader should not pretend to know things that he or she does not know. A leader whose pretentions are exposed will rapidly lose expert power. A confident and decisive leader demonstrates a firm grasp of situations and takes charge when circumstances dictate. To enhance their expert power, managers should also keep themselves informed about developments related to tasks, valuable to the organization, and relevant to their expertise.

A leader who recognizes employee concerns works to understand the underlying nature of these issues and takes appropriate steps to reassure subordinates. To avoid threatening subordinates’ self-esteem, a leader with expert power should be careful not to flaunt expertise or behave like a know-it-all.

My Consultancy–Asif J. Mir – Management Consultant–transforms organizations where people have the freedom to be creative, a place that brings out the best in everybody–an open, fair place where people have a sense that what they do matters. For details please visit www.asifjmir.com, and my Lectures.

Power through Recognition


A manager empowers others by giving them recognition which enhances their self-esteem and motivates them to continue to do their best work. A person’s power to achieve success is dependent upon his belief in himself and his desire to do consistently excellent work. A manager has more power to achieve his own objectives when the people who work for him are confident and motivated to do their best work.

My Consultancy–Asif J. Mir – Management Consultant–transforms organizations where people have the freedom to be creative, a place that brings out the best in everybody–an open, fair place where people have a sense that what they do matters. For details please visit www.asifjmir.com, and my Lectures.

Collaboration


Collaboration is the ability to work in a group, eliciting and offering support to each other member, creating a synergistic environment for everyone. This quality comes up over as we listen to stories of experiences. The behavior of the story-tellers is inclusive. They reach out to other people; they ask for help when they need it; they gather people in, collaborating to get the job done. A significant by-product that often results from this approach is the development of new leadership and great self-esteem for these empowered through shared ownership.

My Consultancy–Asif J. Mir – Management Consultant–transforms organizations where people have the freedom to be creative, a place that brings out the best in everybody–an open, fair place where people have a sense that what they do matters. For details please visit www.asifjmir.com, and my Lectures.

Revisiting Leadership


Human beings are designed for learning. Unfortunately, the primary institutions of a society are oriented predominantly toward controlling rather than learning, rewarding individuals for performing for others rather than for cultivating their natural curiosity and impulse to learn. The young child entering school discovers quickly that the name of the game is getting the right answer and avoiding mistakes—a mandate no less compelling to the aspiring managers.

 

Our prevailing system of management has destroyed our people. People are born with intrinsic motivation, self-esteem, dignity, curiosity to learn, joy in learning. The forces of destruction begin with toddlers—grades in school, gold stars, and on up through the university. On the job, people, teams, divisions are ranked—reward for the one at the top, punishment at the bottom. Incentive pay, business plans, put together separately, division by division, cause further loss, unknown and unknowable.

 

Ironically, by focusing on performing for someone else’s approval, corporations create the very conditions that predestine them to mediocre performance. Over the long run, superior performance depends on superior learning. A full one-third of the Fortune 500 industrials listed in 1970 had vanished by 1983.

 

Today, the average lifetime of the largest industrial enterprises is probably less than half the average lifetime of a person in an industrial society. On the other hand, a small number of companies that survived for seventy-five years or longer. Interestingly, the key to their survival is the ability to run experiments in the margin to continually explore new business and organizational opportunities that create potential new sources of growth.

 

If anything, the need for understanding how organizations learn and accelerating that learning is greater today than ever before. In an increasingly dynamic, interdependent, and unpredictable world, it is simply no longer possible for anyone to figure it all out at the top. The old model, the top thinks and the local acts, must now give way to integrating thinking and acting at all levels.

 

While the challenge is great, so is the potential payoff. The person who figures out how to harness the collective genius of the people in his/her organization is going to blow the competition way.

 

My Consultancy–Asif J. Mir – Management Consultant–transforms organizations where people have the freedom to be creative, a place that brings out the best in everybody–an open, fair place where people have a sense that what they do matters. For details please visit www.asifjmir.com, Line of Sight

Warping Higher Customer Satisfaction


You can improve your management of others to enable you to deliver higher customer satisfaction:

  1. Listen to other people around you,  no matter what their experience or lack of it and listen without judgment–every opinion is a valid one. If you hear two or three ideas together they can often spark a fourth, which you wouldn’t have arrived at if you’d heard them with a judgment.
  2. Use praise. Use praise more frequently and more sincerely than you’ve ever done in the past. Every night when you go home, if you’re a manager or even if you are not, ask yourself have I said thank you? to three people for three different things today? If you haven’t, it either means one of two things: that no body that you work with, or for, has actually done anything which is worth saying thank you for , or that they have done things of note but you haven’t noticed.
  3. If you can’t say something positive, don’t say anything. If you went into a meeting with your manager and they ran through a list of 20 things that they were pleased with and just as you were leaving they delivered one negative criticism, the chances are that this is the one thought that would stay with you, the other 20 would disappear in the length and shadow of the negative criticism. Negative criticism has virtually no practical application. If you have to say something then think it through and put it into a positive context. Remember that people will normally do the best they can with what they have. If they are not doing the best that they can, then you need to help them to see what can be done and what talents, resources, or alternatives exist for the.
  4. Always be seen to be fair and honest. If there’s one thing that can demotivate staff and people around you quicker than almost anything, it is people having favorites.
  5. Share your concerns. Managing a customer service team, an organization, or being an entrepreneur is not an easy job. Whilst you need to be decisive and have confidence and courage that inspires people, there is much to be gained from being open and sharing your own hopes, dreams and concerns.  One of the things that people often like in working in a small business, perhaps one which has an entrepreneurial flair to it, is the enthusiaism and the sheer energy that those people can put into theirday and they do, every signle day. Remind people what you’re doing, where you’re going and why you do what you do.
  6. Become a teacher. Instead of finding fault, managing by exception, and pointing out where people are going wrong, become obsessed with helping people become twice as good as they are now. If you manage people, or you aspire to manage or lead people, then your goal should be to make sure thatas quickly as possible they can do their job twice as well as they’re doing it now, even if it means them being promoting or leaving. There is nothing more satisfying than seeing other people around you do well, especially if you know you’ve contributed to that. Don’t ask yourself what can I do for myself?  Instead, ask yourself, how can I help my team become a better team?  Take a few minutes at regular intervals, at random times during the day if necessary, and teach people different ways of doing things–upgrade their skills, explain different aspects of the business, formalize it–put together different training programs so that people, over a period of time, will really move forward in both their skills, their knowledge and their habits.
  7. Kiesin is a Japanese word that has no equivalent in the English language. It roughly translates as constant and never ending improvement.  The Japanese philosophy is to do a thousand things one percent better not one thing a thousand percent better. This means that everybody that you work with–every supplier, every employee, and every manager, everybody in the customer satisfaction value chain–should be constantly required to innovate, to improve and suggest ideas. Coming up with ways to improve how things are done, should  almost become a mandatory part of any job.
  8. Develop yourself. If there’s one way that you can get other people to become more interested and more focused on improving themselves, it is to lead by example. Take time out to go on training courses, even though you masy be too busy. Take time to read useful information, not just novels, books or newspapers but actual up-to-date books and tesxts from the experts within your industry. Practise your skills, use them and make sure that they’re developed as far as they possibly can be. If it means learning a new language or learning a skill that you don’t have then take on the challenge. It is very difficult to manage people well if you have low self esteem but if you feel good about yourself and you have that feeling of progress and achievement, then it is very hard for this not to rub off on other people.
  9. Only do the most important things. Ask yourself that question or a version of it every single minute of the day:Is what I’m doing now helping directly or indirectly to increase the number and quality of the customers our organization has? Because if it doesn’t affect the customer, it shouldn’t be done.

My Consultancy–Asif J. Mir – Management Consultant–transformserorganizations where people have the freedom to be creative, a place that brings out the best in everybody–an open, fair place where people have a sense that what they do matters. For details please contact Asif J. Mir