The Spectrum of Success


Does success means the same to every organization?

Are all working cultures equal or are some more equal than others?

Is it time for organizations to start making life choices, as people do?

To answer these questions we need to understand exactly what success means to different organizations and what effect an organization’s situation has on its attitude to success.

This is more about the spirit of theory than the exact science of it. It is not meant to baffle but simply illustrate some key facts of organizational life. The theory is built around two principles:

  • Required organizational performance – designed to help to illustrate the level of performance that an organization will be required to deliver in order to successfully achieve its stated goals, in any given market, at any given time; and
  • Actual organizational performance – designed to help to illustrate how effective and tightly focused an organization must be to ensure that it closely matches the performance required to achieve stated goals, with the minimum of waste and unnecessary effort.

My Consultancy–Asif J. Mir – Management Consultant–transforms organizations where people have the freedom to be creative, a place that brings out the best in everybody–an open, fair place where people have a sense that what they do matters. For details please visit www.asifjmir.com, and my Lectures.

Markets as Networks


Actual firm relationships must be seen on a spectrum between outright competition at one end and collusion at the other. At the very least, such a self-evident observation raises the issue of the firm (or business unit) as the basic, and often only, unit of analysis: in certain circumstances we might more appropriately consider an information coalition of such firms as the key unit.

Earlier, the border of the company was seen as the dividing line between co-operation and conflict – cooperation within the company and conflict in relation to all external units. The corresponding means for coordination are heirarchy and the market mechanism. The existence of relationships makes this picture more diffuse. There are great opportunities for cooperation with a lot of external units forming, for example, coalitions. Thus, it is often more fruitful to see the company as a part of a network instead of a free and independent actor in an atomistic martket.

However, the recognition that there is a network of relationships is merely the first step. Approaches need to be developed for the analysis of the network.

My Consultancy–Asif J. Mir – Management Consultant–transforms organizations where people have the freedom to be creative, a place that brings out the best in everybody–an open, fair place where people have a sense that what they do matters. For details please visit www.asifjmir.com, Lectures, Line of Sight