Workable Change


For years social scientists have said that humans resist change—and so they do. But they resist only those changes they do not understand, are suspicious of, or consider to be against their interests. Humans embrace change that seems good for them or good for the world they live in and care about.

A new idea or new expectation, in itself, will seldom bring about change. On the other hand, change can be very attractive if it is the product of a new idea or expectation that appears to be in the best interests of the people who are expected to adopt it, if it is accompanied by the means for its fulfillment, and if it results in recognition and approval. To improve an organization, we must introduce good ideas, establish the means for making them work, and provide a visible payoff for the effort involved.

No organization can reach its full potential unless it promotes and enjoys the coordination of productive activities among its members. The more complex the activities of the organization, the more need there is for coordination if the organization is to flourish. No one knows it all anymore. Teamwork is an increasingly critical element in organizational success; fortunately, it is not difficult to achieve. But teamwork must be managed into existence through experiences that are capable of producing teamwork.

My Consultancy–Asif J. Mir – Management Consultant–transforms organizations where people have the freedom to be creative, a place that brings out the best in everybody–an open, fair place where people have a sense that what they do matters. For details please visit www.asifjmir.com, and my Lectures.

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Customer Service: Interpreting Perceptions


Once we’ve made our perceptions, we need to evaluate them. For example, is a customer nervously looking around because the customer is impatient and wants to be served, hyperactive, or a potential shoplifter? By evaluating customer behavior against the following factors, you can then determine a course of action.

  • Past experiences you’ve had in similar situations. If it is 90 degrees outside and the nervous customer has on a long winter coat, you may be justified in being suspicious.
  • Beliefs about human behavior. Personal beliefs that people are basically decent or evil, pessimistic or optimistic, happy or sad, can influence the way you interact with others.
  • Awareness of information about a person that can impact your reactions. For example, if you know one customer enjoys talking in detail about features and warranties of a product while another only wants the features highlighted, you may structure information accordingly.
  • Expectations of the outcome of an interaction. For example, if you are optimistic about making a sale, you may subconsciously send nonverbal messages that positively influence customers or encourage them to do business with you.

My Consultancy–Asif J. Mir – Management Consultant–transforms organizations where people have the freedom to be creative, a place that brings out the best in everybody–an open, fair place where people have a sense that what they do matters. For details please visit www.asifjmir.com, Line of Sight