Writing a Marketing Plan


  • Use a direct, professional writing style. Use appropriate business and marketing terms without jargon. Present and future tenses with active voice are generally better than past tense and passive voice.
  • Be positive and specific. At the same time, avoid superlatives (such as terrific, wonderful). Specifics are better than glittering generalities. Use numbers for impact, justifying computations and projections with facts or reasonable quantitative assumptions where possible.
  • Use bullet points for succinctness and emphasis. As with the list you are reading, bullets enable key points to be highlighted effectively and with great efficiency.
  • Use “A level” (the first level) and “B level” (the second level headings under major section headings to help readers make easy transitions from one topic to another. This also forces the writer to organize the plan more carefully. Use these headings liberally, at least once every 200 to 300 words.
  • Use visuals where appropriate. Illustrations, graphs, and charts enable large amounts of information to be presented succinctly.
  • Shoot for a plan 15 to 35 pages in length, not including financial projections and appendices. An uncomplicated small business may require only 15 pages, while a new business startup may require more than 35 pages.
  • Use care in layout, design, and presentation. Laser or ink-jet printers give a more professional look than  do dot matrix printers or typewriters. A bound report with a cover and clear title page adds professionalism.

My Consultancy–Asif J. Mir – Management Consultant–transforms organizations where people have the freedom to be creative, a place that brings out the best in everybody–an open, fair place where people have a sense that what they do matters. For details please visit www.asifjmir.com, and my Lectures.

Doing Foreign Business for Wrong Reasons


The wrong reasons for entering a market include; large population, cheap labor, and “Everyone else is going there.” Population does not necessarily mean consumers or a skilled work force, and even a large consumer base does not mean there is an established market. A terrific investment in education and the establishment of an infrastructure for the conduct of business, whether manufacturing or marketing, may be necessary.

Some markets may be too small to support the cost of doing business. It is critical to enter only these markets where you can serve customers to their satisfaction. An inadequate understanding of products due to degree of technical sophistication and language barriers may require special attention to adapt documentation, training and support to the market and customer. Many apparently small markets can be surprisingly active.

My Consultancy–Asif J. Mir – Management Consultant–transforms organizations where people have the freedom to be creative, a place that brings out the best in everybody–an open, fair place where people have a sense that what they do matters. For details please visit www.asifjmir.com, Lectures, Line of Sight

Extending or Renewing a Contract


Extend, renew, or negotiate a contract when the other party is the happiest, not when the contract is about to expire. Whenever we’ve done an exceptional deal for a client, I encourage the executive in charge to discuss extending the client’s representation agreement then, even ifit still has a year or so to run.

If a customer of yours has received terrific news, even if it has nothing to do with your product—a raise or a bonus, for instance—there’s probably a good timing opportunity there.

Take automatic mood checks. Mood alone can turn a “yes” into a “no” and vice versa.

My Consultancy–Asif J. Mir – Management Consultant–transforms organizations where people have the freedom to be creative, a place that brings out the best in everybody–an open, fair place where people have a sense that what they do matters. For details please contact www.asifjmir.com, Line of Sight

Offering a Choice to Customers


There is usually more than one way to solve a marketing problem, and it is the seller’s responsibility to find the best way to emphasize that while deemphasizing the others. Don’t get caught in the choose-one-from-column-A-and-two-from-column-B trap.

If you give the buyer a choice, you are introducing a whole new layer into the decision-making process. Not only are you asking a customer to make a commitment, you are also asking him, “Which one do you want to commit to?”

We have had situations where we proposed more than one solution to a potential customer’s problem. Frequently the result is that he will like something about each solution. That sounds terrific, but isn’t. by offering a choice, you often help the customer focus as well on what he doesn’t like about each solution.

My Consultancy–Asif J. Mir – Management Consultant–transforms organizations where people have the freedom to be creative, a place that brings out the best in everybody–an open, fair place where people have a sense that what they do matters. For details please contact www.asifjmir.com, Line of Sight